Definition of rector in English:

rector

Syllabification: rec·tor
Pronunciation: /ˈrektər
 
/

noun

1(In the Episcopal Church) a member of the clergy who has charge of a parish.
More example sentences
  • ‘The font was used to baptise Dr Kathleen Lynn; her father was the Anglican rector of the parish in 1874,’ pointed out a local.
  • According to the bishop of London the Anglican rector of South Hackney helped create the shrines, which were visited by the Queen in 1917.
  • The Reverend William Matheus, another member, was assistant rector at St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, a bulwark of progressive social causes.
1.1(In the Roman Catholic Church) a priest in charge of a church or of a religious institution.
More example sentences
  • When the site is fully restored, the local rector Rev Lynda Peilow and the Roman Catholic priest Fr Gerard O'Byrne will hold a ceremony and remaining family members of those buried there will be invited to attend.
1.2(In the Church of England) the incumbent of a parish where all tithes formerly passed to the incumbent. Compare with vicar.
More example sentences
  • The farmers now decided that they should also get some relief in their Tithe payments and deputations went to the rectors in the parish.
  • Tickets are available from the rector, church wardens and the parish office.
  • The eldest son is the rector of four conjoined parishes nearby.
2The head of certain universities, colleges, and schools.
More example sentences
  • The responsibilities of university rectors and senior administrators are not clearly defined.
  • A former rector of the college, he said: ‘At the moment, we do not feel under threat from that direction.’
  • The university rector was appointed for four years by the minister of education and was subordinate to the curator of his educational district.

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin rector 'ruler', from rect- 'ruled', from the verb regere.

Derivatives

rectorate

noun
More example sentences
  • The dispute came to a head when both the rectorate and the foundation placed separate advertisements stating differing versions of the requirements for student applicants.

rectorial

Pronunciation: /rekˈtôrēəl/
adjective
More example sentences
  • A rectorial election is a peculiarly Scottish institution.
  • The protagonists of the story were real students of the time, and the cause of their dispute - a heated argument between the rival camps during a rectorial election - is all too plausible.
  • The perceived wisdom is that the Young Toffs supported Neil's rectorial campaign.

rectorship

noun
More example sentences
  • Two people remain in the running for the rectorship of the University of Indonesia after its board of trustees dropped two candidates during a vote on Monday.
  • Another kind of glory was the opening, during Morgan's rectorship, of The Free Chapel at Prince and Thompson Streets to serve the poor.
  • As well as the rectorship, Ruffini held a chair of applied mathematics, a chair of practical medicine and a chair of clinical medicine in the University of Modena.

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