Definition of retribution in English:

retribution

Syllabification: ret·ri·bu·tion
Pronunciation: /ˌretrəˈbyo͞oSHən
 
/

noun

Derivatives

retributive

Pronunciation: /riˈtribyətiv/
adjective
More example sentences
  • Whether nature or nurture, a common point was the change in attitudes regarding the purpose of justice, shifting from retributive to reformative intent.
  • It is important to note, however, that Brown held that the definition of punishment should not be limited to retributive actions.
  • You have distinguished between a restorative form of justice and a retributive form of justice.

retributory

Pronunciation: /riˈtribyəˌtôrē/
adjective
More example sentences
  • My own moral intuition wishes that people in general, and law professors in particular, understood retributory bloodlust as a natural human reaction, but one that we should learn to suppress, not to indulge in.
  • Blaming the self may allow the perceived deflection of interpersonal hostility and result in a shield against retributory threat from the external environment.
  • In the principles of justice, the concept of retributory justice is important to the victims and the society.

Origin

late Middle English (also in the sense 'recompense for merit or a service'): from late Latin retributio(n-), from retribut- 'assigned again', from the verb retribuere, from re- 'back' + tribuere 'assign'.

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