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retroactive Syllabification: ret·ro·ac·tive
Pronunciation: /ˌretrōˈaktiv/

Definition of retroactive in English:

adjective

(Especially of legislation) taking effect from a date in the past: a big retroactive tax increase
More example sentences
  • The legislation isn't retroactive, so even if the bill is adopted, borrowers who have already consolidated won't be affected.
  • As the Respondent's income has declined since separation, in my view it is appropriate that this amount be retroactive from the date of separation.
  • That order had also addressed the applicant's claim for retroactive spousal support, and costs.

Derivatives

retroaction

1
Pronunciation: /ˌretrōˈakSH(ə)n/
noun
Example sentences
  • A retroaction of the current law would allow an unprecedented number of lots to be created and subsequently developed causing a dramatic land use change.
  • It follows, therefore, that the petitioners' assertion for the retroaction of their claim for back salaries and other benefits effective July 1, 1989 as a result of the reclassification of their positions in 1996 cannot be given due course for want of legal basis.

retroactively

2
Pronunciation: /ˌretrōˈaktivlē/
adverb
Example sentences
  • There is ample authority in the jurisprudence, which supports the view that child support may be ordered retroactively to cover the period of time from the filing of the application to the date of judgment.
  • Other similar laws are being prepared in other states, and these too may be subject to challenge - but such challenges can only take place retroactively, once the laws have been introduced.
  • The offshoot of all this is that your anti-virus software always works retroactively; it provides a cure for an already known virus that rarely remains in circulation for very long.

retroactivity

3
Pronunciation: /ˌretrōˌakˈtivədē/
noun
Example sentences
  • The prohibition on retroactivity of laws finds early expression in the Constitution of the United States 1787 and in the earlier Declarations of Rights adopted by various North American colonies.
  • The Respondent has more income available to him than at the time of the original order and no longer has a spousal support obligation so I do not see retroactivity as an unfair extra burden.
  • In so far as these decisions appear to extend the statutory wording, are they objectionable on grounds of retroactivity and lack of fair warning, or defensible as applications of existing common law doctrine to new situations?

Definition of retroactive in:

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