Definition of rhubarb in English:

rhubarb

Syllabification: rhu·barb
Pronunciation: /ˈro͞oˌbärb
 
/

noun

  • 1The thick leaf stalks of a cultivated plant of the dock family, which are reddish or green and eaten as a fruit after cooking.
    More example sentences
    • Don't, whatever you do, and I'm being one hundred per cent serious here, mix quadruple whiskies, cheeseburgers and re-heated rhubarb pie.
    • There would be rhubarb pie and buttermilk, flags flying and youngsters scampering, a parade, a pageant, and fireworks to light up the night sky.
    • Tom surveyed the table, eyes settling on rhubarb pie.
  • 2The large-leaved Eurasian plant that produces rhubarb.
    • Rheum rhaponticum (or rhabarbarum), family Polygonaceae
    More example sentences
    • Perennials, such as artichokes, asparagus and rhubarb are also sold in bare-root form.
    • As soon as the soil can be worked, plant bare-root asparagus, horseradish, Jerusalem artichokes, and rhubarb.
    • Unfolded flower buds of rhubarb are cooked in the same ways as elderberry flowers.
  • 2.1Used in names of other plants of the sane genus as rhubarb, several of which are used medicinally, e.g., Chinese rhubarb.
    More example sentences
    • Its common name is prickly rhubarb and it does indeed look like rhubarb gone ballistic.
    • Other common names include pestwurz, blatterdock, bog rhubarb, and butter-dock.
  • 3 informal , chiefly British The noise made by a group of actors to give the impression of indistinct background conversation or to represent the noise of a crowd, especially by the random repetition of the word “rhubarb” with different intonations.
    More example sentences
    • Suddenly stuck for words to say, we started saying mumble mumble mumble and rah rah rah and rhubarb rhubarb to each other, and being extra-animated in our facial expressions and gestures.
  • 3.1North American informal A heated dispute: rhubarbs often broke out among these less than professional players
    More example sentences
    • After all, Martin reasoned, such retaliation is a commonplace of baseball, with brushback rhubarbs happening almost weekly every season.
    • Still, it was just a run-of-the-mill rhubarb, barely worth comment, which is true of most such arguments between arbiters and managers or players.
    • An intense rhubarb developed which lasted 34 minutes.

Origin

late Middle English (denoting the rootstock of other plants of this genus used medicinally): from Old French reubarbe, from a shortening of medieval Latin rheubarbarum, alteration (by association with rheum 'rhubarb') of rhabarbarum 'foreign rhubarb', from Greek rha (also meaning 'rhubarb') + barbaros 'foreign'.

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