There are 2 definitions of rout in English:

rout1

Syllabification: rout
Pronunciation: /rout
 
/

noun

1A disorderly retreat of defeated troops: the retreat degenerated into a rout the army was in a state of demoralization verging on rout
More example sentences
  • We do not yet know whether different stages of a battle, such as the initial salvos, a fighting retreat and a rout, have different archaeological signatures.
  • Their retreat had been a rout, and thousands of fleeing refugees, the elderly, women and children, had been slaughtered mercilessly.
  • He turned, his numb and shaking legs turning his retreat into a disordered rout.
Synonyms
retreat, flight
1.1A decisive defeat: the party lost more than half their seats in the rout
More example sentences
  • This Pacific division championship was followed by two decisive routs in the Canada West final four.
  • Even while he was in the thick of the campaign, there were pointers to his party's rout in the 1991 General Election.
  • Despite her electoral rout, the masses, seduced by her silken eloquence into believing that Dr Karunanidhi and his men had been witch hunting her, stood solidly behind her.
Synonyms
crushing defeat, trouncing, annihilation; debacle, fiasco
informal licking, hammering, thrashing, drubbing, massacre
2 Law, dated An assembly of people who have made a move toward committing an illegal act that would constitute an offense of riot.
2.1 archaic A disorderly or tumultuous crowd of people: a rout of strangers ought not to be admitted
3British archaic A large evening party or reception.
More example sentences
  • I intend to live to be a hundred, and to go to ten thousand routs and balls, and to play cards every night of my life till the year eighteen hundred [it is currently 1712].
  • Especially when grand balls, I'm not even mentioning the more intimate routs or soirées, are held just weeks apart.
  • Which of the various routs and balls and musicales would afford her the best chance to find a husband?

verb

[with object] Back to top  
Defeat and cause to retreat in disorder: in a matter of minutes the attackers were routed
More example sentences
  • The Federals, caught out of formation, were routed and were soon in retreat, abandoning their standards and hundreds of prisoners.
  • In France, Henry unexpectedly routs a vastly superior French army at Agincourt and wins the heart of a French princess.
  • He had excelled in every single mission that had been assigned to him, from routing bandits to training whole divisions of new recruits to aid in the war.
Synonyms
put to flight, drive off, scatter; defeat, beat, conquer, vanquish, crush, overpower

Origin

Middle English: ultimately based on Latin ruptus 'broken', from the verb rumpere; sense 1 and the verb ( late 16th century) are from obsolete French route, probably from Italian rotta 'breakup of an army'; the other senses are via Anglo-Norman French rute.

Phrases

put to rout

Put to flight; defeat utterly: I once put a gang to rout
More example sentences
  • I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life, to live so sturdily and Spartan-like as to put to rout all that was not life.
  • This argument is soon put to rout by the assumption that if the remaining days of a centenarian are a mere repetition of yesterday, what delight can be derived from such a pitiable living?
  • The Foundation wants to put to rout what it sees as anti-west bias on college campuses.

Definition of rout in:

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Word of the day humoresque
Pronunciation: ˌhjuːməˈrɛsk
noun
a short, lively piece of music

There are 2 definitions of rout in English:

rout2

Syllabification: rout
Pronunciation: /
 
rout/

verb

1 [with object] Cut a groove, or any pattern not extending to the edges, in (a wooden or metal surface): you routed each plank all along its length
2 another term for root2.
2.1Find (someone or something), or force them from a place: Simon routed him from the stable
More example sentences
  • Weather looks like chance, but some think it's a malign force determined to rout them.
  • To rout this pest, scientists at the labs from coast to coast are making the sharpshooter and the Xylella microbe the focus of ambitious new studies.
  • As a matter of fact, he was completely baffled on how to rout a person that wields luck.

Origin

mid 16th century ( (sense 2)): alteration of the verb root2. (sense 1) dates from the early 19th century.

Definition of rout in: