Definition of rubricate in English:

rubricate

Syllabification: ru·bri·cate
Pronunciation: /ˈro͞obriˌkāt
 
/

verb

chiefly • historical
  • Add elaborate, typically red, capital letters or other decorations to (a manuscript).
    More example sentences
    • Although scholars dispute the details of the early production of his press, the first dated item is a copy of a 42-line Bible, which a scribe finished rubricating on 24 August 1456.
    • The text was rubricated either by the scribe himself, or one of his colleagues, who highlighted in red ink significant portions, phrases and words.
    • The text is rubricated throughout with red titles and red Lombards.

Derivatives

rubrication

Pronunciation: /ˌro͞obriˈkāSHən/
noun
More example sentences
  • Many woodcuts copy manuscript illuminations, and some try printed rubrication of paraphs or initials.

rubricator

Pronunciation: /-ˌkātər/
noun
More example sentences
  • Often, even into the fifteenth century, the rubricator and the scribe were the same person, as is the case in the Kirby I.

Origin

late 16th century: from Latin rubricat- 'marked in red', from the verb rubricare, from rubrica (see rubric).

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