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rug

Syllabification: rug
Pronunciation: /rəɡ
 
/

Definition of rug in English:

noun

1A floor covering of thick woven material or animal skin, typically not extending over the entire floor.
Example sentences
  • Woven rugs often cover the floors of Uzbek houses.
  • Woven rugs covered the hardwood floor, the many rooms visible on their course quite large and possessing great amounts of valuables.
  • Though it had tried, the company had not succeeded in establishing its rugs as year-round floor coverings.
Synonyms
mat, carpet, runner;
hearth rug, floor cloth
1.1chiefly British A thick woolen coverlet or wrap, used especially when traveling.
Example sentences
  • When he was lowered to the ground, his box was tipped on its side to enable an emotional Blaine to stagger out wrapped in a rug.
  • But stoics take rugs, umbrellas, thick coats and bracing amounts of booze.
  • During the summer months, the light lasts well into the evening while passengers sit on deck, wrapped in rugs, marvelling at the beauty of the glaciers.
1.2 informal , chiefly North American A toupee or wig.
Example sentences
  • I hereby sentence the actors to get a haircut so they won't need to wear the bad rugs.
  • I was actually disappointed that his tresses were not the result of a bad rug.
  • One in 10 is tempted to conceal her wayward tresses under a rug when it becomes frizzy, dry, dull or takes on a life of its own.
Synonyms

Origin

mid 16th century (denoting a type of coarse woolen cloth): probably of Scandinavian origin; compare with Norwegian dialect rugga 'coverlet', Swedish rugg 'ruffled hair'; related to rag1. The sense 'small carpet' dates from the early 19th century.

Phrases

pull the rug (out) from under

1
Abruptly withdraw support from (someone): the rug was pulled right out from beneath our feet
More example sentences
  • More importantly, though, Russell's narrative pulls the rug from under us, changing our perceptions of all three characters.
  • But yesterday he effectively pulled the rug from under them by introducing 19 per cent corporation tax levy on those profits.
  • In both countries, it was the external patron whom the local regimes had relied on for protection that pulled the rug from under them.

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