There are 2 definitions of sate in English:

sate1

Syllabification: sate
Pronunciation: /sāt
 
/

verb

[with object]
1Satisfy (a desire or an appetite) to the full: sate your appetite at the resort’s restaurant
More example sentences
  • Two years before, he had begun writing to them, asking for photos, information, anything to sate a schoolboy's appetite for space exploration.
  • When you fuel yourself with foods that your body is craving, make a note of how they've sated your appetite or how you felt after eating them.
  • Nuts are high in monounsaturated ‘good’ fats and a handful may sate an overzealous appetite.
1.1Supply (someone) with as much as or more of something than is desired or can be managed.
More example sentences
  • I don't know what I could do with a lot of what I get, as I'm already sated with so much good stuff.
  • If that doesn't sate you, the Macdonalds can organise fishing, deer-stalking, pony-trekking and hiking.
  • These were films to sate our inner children, perfect movies that crossed generational borders.

Origin

early 17th century: probably an alteration of dialect sade, from Old English sadian 'become sated or weary' (related to sad). The change in the final consonant was due to association with satiate.

Derivatives

sateless

adjective
( literary )

Definition of sate in:

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Word of the day envenom
Pronunciation: ɪnˈvɛnəm
verb
put poison on or into; make poisonous

There are 2 definitions of sate in English:

sate2

Syllabification: sate
Pronunciation: /sat, sāt
 
/

verb

archaic spelling of sat.
More example sentences
  • She sate on the log of a fallen tree, of which there were many.

Definition of sate in:

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Word of the day envenom
Pronunciation: ɪnˈvɛnəm
verb
put poison on or into; make poisonous