Definition of scholasticism in English:

scholasticism

Syllabification: scho·las·ti·cism
Pronunciation: /skəˈlastiˌsizəm
 
/

noun

1The system of theology and philosophy taught in medieval European universities, based on Aristotelian logic and the writings of the early Church Fathers and having a strong emphasis on tradition and dogma.
More example sentences
  • Finally, he examines the decreasing influence of strict Reformed theology due to rising scholasticism, sectarianism and natural theology based on enlightened philosophy.
  • To press that case, the book has to ignore most of the theological and philosophical traditions from the rise of medieval scholasticism to the twentieth-century declaration that ‘God is dead.’
  • Medieval scholasticism had trained students in Latin, letter-writing and philosophy, but its teachers and thinkers were generally subservient to the authorities (usually the church) for which they worked.
1.1Narrow-minded insistence on traditional doctrine.
More example sentences
  • You may temporarily lose the will to live, under the weight of its wilful pomposity, laboured scholasticism and, let's be frank, myriad boring bits, but it won't actually kill you.
  • In later life he was sensitive to the resemblance between the Thomistic scholasticism in which he was trained and the Marxist scholasticism that he embraced as an adult.
  • This text highlights how my training in philosophy was a plunging into the history of philosophy (analytic, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Adorno etc) with its dangers of scholasticism.

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