Definition of segue in English:

segue

Syllabification: se·gue
Pronunciation: /ˈseɡwā, ˈsā-
 
/

verb (segues, segueing /ˈseɡwā-iNG, ˈsā-/, segued /ˈseɡwād, ˈsā-/)

[no object]
(In music and film) move without interruption from one song, melody, or scene to another: allowing one song to segue into the next
More example sentences
  • Once the producers felt we had seen enough of that, the camera seemlessly segued into another grassy scene: one with prehistoric, upright, hairy Homo habilis digging holes and groping for food, circa two million years ago.
  • He captivated the audience, artfully segueing from songs that made you laugh, to ones that stilled the crowd with their meaningfulness, their power.
  • Quickly paced, with each song segueing seamlessly into the next, it's a homage to the golden age of crossover.

noun

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An uninterrupted transition from one piece of music or film scene to another.
More example sentences
  • Riffs on Hoagy Carmichael's ‘Georgia on My Mind’ are obvious musical cues and are used as segues throughout the film.
  • They serve not only as brilliant segues within the film's narrative but also contribute to a larger purpose of imbuing the viewer with an intense, discombobulated sensation that can only be described as ‘punch drunk’.
  • The film's segues into the seedier side of Austria are always appropriately shocking, and Erika's steadfast resolve in these environments is an utterly jarring anachronism.

Origin

Italian, literally 'follows'.

Definition of segue in:

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