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ski

Syllabification: ski
Pronunciation: /skē
 
/

Definition of ski in English:

noun (plural skis)

1Each of a pair of long narrow pieces of hard flexible material, typically pointed and turned up at the front, fastened under the feet for gliding over snow.
Example sentences
  • If you own waxless skis, try a pair of waxable skis on a day when it is below freezing.
  • In my experience, the fit of the ski is not nearly as important as whether you have a good pair of skis.
  • Neither of the fundraisers have even put on a pair of skis or salopettes, but they intend to glide down the slopes with ease in the 26 mile event.
1.1A device similar to a ski attached beneath a vehicle or aircraft.
Example sentences
  • These one- or two-passenger vehicles attached to three skis had an enclosed cab and a small airplane engine mounted on the rear.
  • The machine took flight and landed on its skis and continued to be piloted by some unseen force toward a cropping of baby trees further down the slope.
  • The skis get hot, and when the aircraft stops the skis can stick to the ice.
1.2 [as modifier] Of, relating to, or used for skiing: a ski instructor ski boots
More example sentences
  • Despite the lessons learnt from Thredbo, the New South Wales Government is pushing ahead with more ski resort development in the National Park at Perisher.
  • Heavy snow brought life almost to a standstill at South Africa's only ski resort, Tiffindell, in the Eastern Cape.
  • There are more than 200 ski instructors in Borovets who take care of skiing classes separated in five difficulty levels.
1.3 another term for waterski.
Example sentences
  • Mr Fieldhouse said the next protest was planned for May Day, when families would be invited to wakesurf, water-ski on wide skis and ‘break the by-law’.

verb (skis, skied /skēd/, skiing /ˈskē-iNG/)

[no object] Back to top  
1Travel over snow on skis; take part in the sport or recreation of skiing: they skied down the mountain
More example sentences
  • Her favourite sport is skiing, and as a student she often cycled to class.
  • I have skied and taught through most of the innovations in our equipment and changes in our skiing technique.
  • Most headed to big resorts on the Black Sea, but some traveled to the mountains to ski or hike.
1.1 [with object] Ski on (a particular ski run or type of snow): spring snow is not always easy to ski
More example sentences
  • Not so long ago, I took a cable-car from Cervinia to Plan Maison and spent the day with the baby while the rest of my family skied the prepared pistes.
  • For seven days we climbed and skied perfect corn snow, sunbathed by the pool, and languished in the hot tub.
  • The 25-year-old Scot had never skied the Bormio piste before this week and the Edinburgh-based skier has only had two training runs on the treacherous slope.

Origin

mid 18th century: from Norwegian, from Old Norse skíth 'stick of wood, snowshoe'.

More
  • skid from (late 17th century):

    This was first used in the sense ‘supporting beam’; it may be related to Old Norse skíth ‘billet, snowshoe’ (which also gave English ski in the mid 18th century via Norwegian). The verb was first used meaning ‘fasten a skid to (a wheel) to slow its motion’, later coming to mean ‘slip’. To hit the skids, ‘to begin a rapid decline or deterioration’, and the similar to put the skids under someone or something both originated in the USA. This skid is a North American term for a wooden roller that is used as part of a set to move logs or other heavy objects. Once a log is on the skids it can be slid forward very easily, gathering momentum until it reaches the end of the rollers and comes to an abrupt halt. Skid row, meaning ‘a run-down part of town frequented by tramps and alcoholics’, is also connected with logging. It originated as skid road in the late 19th century, and at first simply described a part of town frequented by loggers.

Derivatives

skiable

1
adjective
Example sentences
  • There's a good deal of easy/moderate trails plus some fun more advanced sections that under good conditions should be skiable by most competent skiers.
  • The trail network has been designed with a variety of skiing abilities in mind with over half the terrain skiable by novices.
  • If you're on ice forgo your skis and use crampons until you find skiable snow.

Words that rhyme with ski

absentee, açai, addressee, adoptee, agree, allottee, amputee, appellee, appointee, appraisee, après-ski, assignee, asylee, attendee, bailee, bain-marie, Bangui, bargee, bawbee, be, Bea, bee, bootee, bouquet garni, bourgeoisie, Brie, BSc, buckshee, Capri, cc, chimpanzee, cohabitee, conferee, consignee, consultee, Cree, debauchee, decree, dedicatee, Dee, degree, deportee, dernier cri, detainee, devisee, devotee, divorcee, draftee, dree, Dundee, dungaree, eau-de-vie, emcee, employee, endorsee, en famille, ennui, enrollee, escapee, esprit, evacuee, examinee, expellee, fee, fiddle-de-dee, flea, flee, fleur-de-lis, foresee, franchisee, free, fusee (US fuzee), Gardaí, garnishee, gee, ghee, glee, goatee, grandee, Grand Prix, grantee, Guarani, guarantee, he, HMRC, indictee, inductee, internee, interviewee, invitee, jamboree, Jaycee, jeu d'esprit, key, knee, Lea, lee, legatee, Leigh, lessee, Ley, licensee, loanee, lychee, manatee, Manichee, maquis, Marie, marquee, me, Midi, mortgagee, MSc, nominee, obligee, Otomi, parolee, Parsee, parti pris, patentee, Pawnee, payee, pea, pee, permittee, plc, plea, pledgee, pollee, presentee, promisee, quay, ratatouille, referee, refugee, releasee, repartee, retiree, returnee, rupee, scot-free, scree, sea, secondee, see, settee, Shanxi, Shawnee, shchi, she, shea, si, sirree, spree, standee, suttee, tant pis, tea, tee, tee-hee, Tennessee, testee, the, thee, three, thuggee, Tiree, Torquay, trainee, Tralee, transferee, tree, Trincomalee, trustee, tutee, twee, Twi, undersea, vestee, vis-à-vis, wagon-lit, Waikiki, warrantee, we, wee, whee, whoopee, ye, yippee, Zuider Zee

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