Definition of skiffle in English:

skiffle

Syllabification: skif·fle
Pronunciation: /ˈskifəl
 
/

noun

  • 1US (In the US) a style of 1920s and 1930s jazz deriving from blues, ragtime, and folk music, using both improvised and conventional instruments.
    More example sentences
    • Without Elvis, we might all be listening to jazz or skiffle.
    • Forster makes similar observations on ‘Born to a Family,’ working off of a nice change-of-pace skiffle beat.
    • On a skiffle groove, the Chicks wag their fingers at the homemakers' life, singing about the pleasures of cooking, dusting, and breeding.
  • 2British A kind of folk music with a blues or jazz flavor that was popular in the 1950s, played by a small group and often incorporating improvised instruments such as washboards.
    More example sentences
    • From swing to big bands and from skiffle to psychedelia, the face of music was ever-evolving in the four decades starting in the 1930s.
    • A skiffle group is never gonna happen ever again.
    • Glasgow-born Donegan paved the way for the British pop explosion of the 1960s with skiffle, a blend of folk, blues and jazz.

Origin

1920s: perhaps imitative.

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Word of the day coloratura
Pronunciation: ˌkɒlərəˈtjʊərə
noun
elaborate ornamentation of a vocal melody