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sky

Syllabification: sky
Pronunciation: /skī
 
/

Definition of sky in English:

noun (plural skies)

(often the sky)
1The region of the atmosphere and outer space seen from the earth: hundreds of stars shining in the sky Jillson had never seen so much sky
More example sentences
  • Now, the sun floated high above them in a clear, cloudless blue sky.
  • What was once an empty backdrop of a starry sky was filled with a bright, silvery object.
  • You can see the pyramid, you can see the dark, gray skies.
Synonyms
upper atmosphere
literary heavens, firmament, blue, (wide) blue yonder, welkin, azure, empyrean
1.1 literary Heaven; heavenly power: the just vengeance of incensed skies

verb (skies, skying, skied)

[with object] informal Back to top  
1Hit (a ball) high into the air: he skied his tee shot
More example sentences
  • The visiting attack were bankrupt of ideas and resorted to skying balls in form distance.
  • He skied the ball so high that it probably cleared the stand, never mind the cross bar.
  • Hooper himself was the victim of the worst fielding error of the match when Cullinan skied the ball towards deep mid-wicket.
1.1Hang (a picture) very high on a wall, especially in an exhibition.

Origin

Middle English (also in the plural denoting clouds): from Old Norse ský 'cloud'. The verb dates from the early 19th century.

More
  • loft from (Old English):

    In Old English loft meant ‘air, sky’ as well as what was up in the air, an upper room. It comes from Old Norse, and shares a Germanic root with lift (Old English). Sky (Middle English) was also a borrowing from Scandinavian and originally meant ‘cloud’. The word was applied to a shade of blue in the mid 17th century; the phrase out of a clear blue sky, for something as unexpected as rain or thunder out of such a sky, made its appearance towards the end of the 19th century; the sky's the limit dates from the 1920s. When Anglo-Saxons wanted to talk about the sky they could also use the word wolcen, welkin in modern English, but now only used in the expression to make the welkin ring.

Phrases

out of a clear blue sky

1
see blue1.

the sky's the limit

2
informal There is practically no limit (to something such as a price that can be charged or the opportunities afforded to someone).
Example sentences
  • Once an individual has this frame of mind the sky is the limit for opportunities and challenges that lie ahead.
  • As far as bond prices are concerned the sky is the limit.
  • On the other hand, this does not mean that the sky is the limit as far as prices are concerned.

to the skies

3
Very highly; enthusiastically: he wrote to his sister praising Lizzie to the skies
More example sentences
  • This, after all, is the man who can praise public service workers to the skies and then, almost in the next breath, dismiss them as wreckers.
  • Both films were praised to the skies; and indeed, they are very accomplished.
  • We're going to write lots of articles praising him to the skies.
Synonyms
effusively, profusely, very highly, very enthusiastically, unreservedly, fervently, fulsomely, extravagantly

Derivatives

skyey

1
Pronunciation: /ˈskīē/
adjective
Example sentences
  • The arc of pop continues up and out, happily free and unconstrained as it tracks into the skyey void.
  • Black enrollment at the historically university ties has climbed skyey to nearly 10.4 percent this year, just short of the 10.6 percent target.
  • It's everything he is not, except for the skyey messenger from outer space visiting our low earth, which might fit.

skyless

2
adjective
Example sentences
  • At the very end of his long effort measured by skyless space and time without depth, the purpose is achieved.
  • Derek Jarman opens his claustrophobic, skyless Caravaggio with the feverish artist on his shadowy deathbed.
  • What if I leave the skyless pit I was born into?

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Word of the day tenebrous
Pronunciation: ˈtɛnɪbrəs
adjective
dark; shadowy or obscure