Definition of slam in English:

slam

Syllabification: slam
Pronunciation: /slam
 
/

verb (slams, slamming, slammed)

[with object]
1Shut (a door, window, or lid) forcefully and loudly: he slams the door behind him as he leaves
More example sentences
  • The plane's propeller began to whirl loudly, and Cory slammed the door shut.
  • When I finally did open it, I bolted inside and slammed the door shut behind myself.
  • I glared at him not bothering to dignify that with a response, I walked out into the street slamming the door shut behind me.
Synonyms
bang, shut/close with a bang, shut/close noisily, shut/close with force
1.1 [no object] Be closed forcefully and loudly: she heard a car door slam
More example sentences
  • The door slammed and the car screeched off at high speed.
  • As Tristan packs up his briefcase and prepares to leave the empty club for the night, he's surprised to hear the sound of a car door slamming outside.
  • She heard yelling and a car door slamming and screeching off.
1.2Push or put somewhere with great force: Charlie slammed down the phone
More example sentences
  • He pushed back slamming her into the wall she was chained to.
  • The force from the explosion slammed Christin against the opposite wall hard.
  • Dracainya was hit by an invisible force that slammed her into the wall behind her, cracking the stone.
1.3 [no object] (slam into) Crash into; collide heavily with: the car mounted the sidewalk, slamming into a lamppost
More example sentences
  • Witnesses spoke of hearing a distinctive crash as the train slammed into the car.
  • Karen slams into Beltraw knocking him off-balance.
  • Grunting, he toppled over, slamming into the Skipper and driving him against the bottom of the boat.
Synonyms
crash into, smash into, collide with, hit, strike, ram, plow into, run into, bump into, impact
1.4 informal Hit (something) with great force in a particular direction: he slammed a shot into the net
More example sentences
  • Fortunately for a red-faced Basham, former Shelbourne striker Foran slammed his shot straight at the legs of Alan Fettis.
  • Andrew Dawson hit the pass of the match with a ball that curled behind the Marske defence but Alcide could only slam his shot straight at Mohan.
  • We were intensely hitting the ball back and forth to each other until she did hit that loopy shot, and I slammed it back at her.
1.5Put (something) into action suddenly or forcefully: I slammed on the brakes
More example sentences
  • Suddenly, he slams the car into reverse on the muddy road, almost sliding into a ditch.
  • He screamed at the car, still slamming the brakes, but nothing was happening.
  • Then his mouth slammed down on the smile as his right foot slammed down on the brakes.
1.6 [no object] Move violently or loudly: he slammed out of the room
More example sentences
  • His fist slammed down onto the cold floor next to him.
  • Aaron tried to take a step, but faltered and slammed back against the wall.
  • Suddenly, her heel caught in a pothole and her body slammed to the ground.
1.7 (usually be slammed) informal Criticize severely: his efforts to slam the president destroyed his own campaign
More example sentences
  • My first book, Premier Roman, was published when I was 23 and slammed by the critics.
  • Critics have slammed the BBC for even considering the idea of running adverts on its Web site.
  • His critics have slammed him for exaggerating racial and political issues confronting the city.
1.8 informal , chiefly North American Score points against or gain a victory over (someone) easily: the Blue Devils slammed Kansas to win the title
1.9 (often as noun slamming) (Of a telephone company) take over the account of (a telephone customer) without their permission.
More example sentences
  • ComReg also proposes an end to slamming where a customer has been signed over to a new supplier without consent.
  • This proceeding represents the first joint federal/state effort against a company engaged in slamming.

noun

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1 [usually in singular] A loud bang caused by the forceful shutting of something such as a door: the back door closed with a slam
More example sentences
  • The door shut with an echoing slam, so loud in the unusual silence.
  • With a loud slam, the door was tightly shut, and darkness once again returned to the room.
  • It was at that precise moment that Madison casually strolled in, pulling the heavy barn door shut with a loud slam.
2 (usually the slam) North American informal Prison.
[abbreviation of slammer]
More example sentences
  • Another postseason with no title, and now Rafael Furcal is in the slam.
  • It could be fear, fear of the slam, and then that dictates to them what they should do.
3chiefly US A poetry contest in which competitors recite their entries and are judged by members of the audience, the winner being elected after several elimination rounds.
[of unknown origin]
More example sentences
  • Poetry slams consist of live performance-sometimes from a text, more often from memory.
  • Performing is fun, but personally, I don't really care about the competition aspect of slam poetry.
  • There's also a slam poetry event on the 14th where the winner gets 50 bucks and a slot in that night's gala.
4 Bridge A grand slam (all thirteen tricks) or small slam (twelve tricks), for which bonus points are scored if bid and made.
[ early 17th century (as the name of a card game): origin unknown]
More example sentences
  • The special combinations that beat twos are called slams.
  • In the very first board of the final, she scored a ‘white slam century’ - all coins polished off in a single take.
4.1(Especially in tennis) any of the individual championships that together comprise a Grand Slam: a stellar 12 months saw her win two slams and two Olympic gold medals, and retain the number one ranking
More example sentences
  • The Belarusian will surely win another slam this season, with her prospects of knocking Williams off one of her perches at Wimbledon and Flushing Meadows looking good.
  • He will enter next week's Australian Open as one of the favourites, alongside holder Novak Djokovic, after winning his first Slam at last year's US Open.
  • To win his first Slam at Wimbledon, the most prestigious one, the most traditional one, the oldest one, is something that I don't think even he could have imagined.

Origin

early 17th century: probably of Scandinavian origin; compare with Old Norse slam(b)ra.

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