Definition of smite in English:

smite

Syllabification: smite
Pronunciation: /smīt
 
/

verb (past smote /smōt/; past participle smitten /ˈsmitn/)

1 [with object] literary Strike with a firm blow: he smites the water with his sword
More example sentences
  • Giles, aware that Warne was more musketeer in approach than monk, cleverly tossed one higher and shorter as Warne advanced to smite another blow.
  • With the three as one, the weapon will bring order to the land and its warring Duah, a firm hand to smite the darkness and usher in peace.
  • The beauty of it smote his heart, as he looked up out of the forsaken land, and hope returned to him.
1.1 archaic Defeat or conquer (a people or land): he may smite our enemies
More example sentences
  • After the ruler's next refusal, a plague of locusts smote the land and Moses brought a darkness for three days.
  • She will smite the empires with her wrath, and in her sorrow wash them away!
  • Love looks like weakness, and fundamentalists, he says, want a strong God who can smite their enemies.
1.2 (usually be smitten) (Especially of disease) attack or affect severely: various people had been smitten with untimely summer flu
More example sentences
  • There she was attacked by the plague demon, Namtar, smitten with disease from head to foot and kept prisoner by the Queen.
  • When subsequently inoculated with virus-containing matter, they became smitten with the disease.
  • Leprosy is used in the Scriptures to symbolize sin, and was sometimes inflicted by the Lord as a punishment for sin, as, for instance, in the case of Miriam, Moses' sister, who was smitten with leprosy because of her improper attitude and disrespectful language to and about her brother Moses.
2 (be smitten) Be strongly attracted to someone or something: she was so smitten with the boy
More example sentences
  • According to Greek mythology, the God of Eros supposedly would strike a person in the eyes and make them smitten with their beloved.
  • He claims to be smitten with Vera and strikes a deal with Ford to have a private, paid meeting with the young femme fatale.
  • A source told America's New York Post newspaper: ‘They've been dating for about two weeks and they seem smitten with each other.’

noun

archaic Back to top  
A heavy blow or stroke with a weapon or the hand.
More example sentences
  • Jordan prepared a smite from his Longsword, and then stabbed straight into the King's heart.

Origin

Old English smītan 'to smear, blemish', of Germanic origin; related to Dutch smijten and German schmeissen 'to fling'.

Derivatives

smiter

noun
More example sentences
  • And they were gripped by fear, for he was a centurion and a trained smiter of men.

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