Definition of snare in English:

snare

Syllabification: snare
Pronunciation: /sne(ə)r
 
/

noun

1A trap for catching birds or animals, typically one having a noose of wire or cord.
More example sentences
  • Most poachers used silent and invisible methods such as wire snares and jaw traps to capture their quarry, be it deer or tigers.
  • How many snares would a single hunter set in the forest?
  • In her diary entry for 4 June 1832, Sally Brown noted catching two partridges, probably using snares.
Synonyms
1.1A thing likely to lure or tempt someone into harm or error: the wickedness and snares of the Devil
More example sentences
  • Be our defense against the wickedness and snares of the devil.
  • Artists have been consciously aware for a very long time of the conflict between aesthetic image and reality and the fact that this conflict poses a specific set of contradictions, difficulties and potential snares.
  • Perhaps, if those children received help at this early stage, they might not fall permanently into the vicious snare of shyness which can leave adults, like Lynne Crawford, reflecting sadly on a life of missed opportunities.
Synonyms
pitfall, trap, catch, danger, hazard, peril; web, mesh
2A length of wire, gut, or hide stretched across a drumhead to produce a rattling sound.
2.1 short for snare drum.
More example sentences
  • He moved with butterfly-like motions between his snare drum, his bass drums and his cymbals in a jubilant pattern.
  • Sure, it had a fine array of percussion - timpani, snare drum, bass drum, gong, glockenspiel - but they were just there for effect.
  • Gentle brush strokes on a snare drum and soft, lilting vocals are all well and good, but pure pleasantness is apt to fall into the category of being dangerously languorous.
3 Surgery A wire loop for severing polyps or other growths.
More example sentences
  • If a polyp or abnormality is found, your doctor may choose to remove it with a snare or using cautery.
  • The operator slowly closed the snare as the wire advanced through the tissue allowing for simultaneous cutting and coagulation.
  • If a polyp or abnormal tissue is found, the doctor may choose to remove it with a snare or cautery, or may take a biopsy.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
1Catch (a bird or mammal) in a snare.
More example sentences
  • Concerned fishermen put pilchard bait on a rock, snared the bird and cut the nylon away.
  • Paying no attention, other men were trying to snare birds with their shirts.
  • They used a quad bike and a hurling net to snare the pig who had captured the front page readers for the past three weeks.
Synonyms
1.1Catch or trap (someone): I snared a passing waiter
More example sentences
  • Dubbed the Black Widow, the 43-year-old mother-of-one wove webs of fantasy to snare her male victims, often luring them with promises of a new life that police would come to call the American Dream.
  • The faintest bit of curiosity is all it takes to snare you.
  • It's Sadie Hawkins day, and a prime opportunity for the women of Dogpatch to snare a husband.

Origin

late Old English sneare, from Old Norse snara.

Derivatives

snarer

noun
More example sentences
  • Tucked among the trees on the northern end of the plains, I visited the decaying remains of a snarer's hut.
  • Activities conducted in the area included education and awareness seminars for snarers and trappers during the winter snaring and trapping seasons.
  • Only fully certified snarers would be allowed to operate in March ‘to ensure the highest level of protection for non-target species,’ the report recommended.

Definition of snare in:

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Pronunciation: ˈsiːtəʊs
adjective
bearing bristles or setae; bristly