There are 2 main definitions of sod in English:

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sod 1

Syllabification: sod

noun

(the sod)
1The surface of the ground, with the grass growing on it.
Example sentences
  • I chunked my stuff on the sod and lay down next to it.
  • Heavy grazing the previous fall is essential to weaken and open up the sod when tillage or chemical control of the sod are not used.
  • Put plastic runners on both sides of the trench to avoid damage to your lawn, one runner for the sod and the other runner for the dirt.
1.1A piece of this, usually sold in rolls and used to start a new lawn, athletic field, etc.
Example sentences
  • Remove dead patches along with 3 to 4 inches of soil underneath; fill the hole with a fresh piece of sod, as shown above, or overseed.
  • Then either seed, plant new plugs, or insert a fresh piece of sod cut to fit the damaged area.
  • You can make an instant lawn of buffalo grass using sod, or for a fraction of the cost and a couple months of establishment time, use seed.

verb (sods, sodding, sodded)

[with object] Back to top  
Cover with sod or pieces of turf: the stadium has been sodded
More example sentences
  • After construction was completed, we installed the remaining plants and sodded the lawn.
  • We planted and sodded the lawn and installed an irrigation system throughout.

Phrases

the old sod

1
One’s native country.
Example sentences
  • Anyone who has the occasion, who has Irish lineage and returns to the old sod, as they say, is pleasantly surprised by the welcome.
  • There is a growing interest with people who once were residents of Tubbercurry, but now reside in England or America, to keep close contact with the old sod by way of the Internet and the local press is one such source of information for them.
  • The program will feature the Scots-Irish influences in the sessions that might have been played by the men themselves on the bagpipes, recorders and fiddles that had accompanied them from the old sod.

under the sod

2
Dead and buried in a grave.
Example sentences
  • On April 10, 1943, Lees-Milne wrote, ‘I would like this diary to entertain two or three generations ahead when I am under the sod.’
  • He has property enough to make us independent but that will be valuable only, when we are under the Sod.
  • Time will run to seed when we are under the sod; there'll be time enough and to spare then.

Origin

Late Middle English: from Middle Dutch and Middle Low German sode, of unknown ultimate origin.

Words that rhyme with sod

bod, clod, cod, god, hod, mod, nod, od, odd, plod, pod, prod, quad, quod, scrod, shod, squad, tod, Todd, trod, wad

Definition of sod in:

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There are 2 main definitions of sod in English:

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sod 2 Syllabification: sod
vulgar slang, chiefly British

noun

1An unpleasant or obnoxious person.
Example sentences
  • This morning, 11 o'clock came round, still no binmen, so I said, ‘Right, I'm phoning the sods up.’
  • Piling onto a rail replacement bus at Stratford we grumpily sit there to Leyton, begrudging those sods whose journey was already ending.
  • I work part time in this particular store and the majority of customer seem a miserable bunch of sods, or do I just have a monopoly on the miserable?
1.1A person of a specified kind.
Example sentences
  • He's got a reputation as a grumpy old sod - most artistic people have.
  • I really don't want to complain about students because that is to turn into just the sort of grumpy old sod I knew for sure I would never become.
  • I'm angry that some inconsiderate sod put a column in the middle of the office, right where the corridor wall would be if we had not chosen to go open-plan, and right where I was walking at the time.
1.2Something that is difficult or causes problems.
Example sentences
  • Daylight hours and yes, the clocks have gone back, although for now it's nice to wake up in daylight again, but going home in darkness is going to be a sod.
  • The roots had gone deep, so it was a bit of a sod to dig out.
  • It falls all over the floor, worktops, cooker, ladder and is a sod to get off.

verb (sods, sodding, sodded)

[with object] Back to top  
1Used to express one’s anger or annoyance at someone or something.
Example sentences
  • I always think I should answer the door in the most melodramatic manner possible… sod the wheelchair, I should just drag myself and lay on the floor behind the front door.
  • ‘Can take between 14 and 20 days’ - sod it, I could do it in a week.
  • When he could find work at all, he spent the Eighties being unremarkable in unremarkable productions, filed for bankruptcy and eventually decided to sod the whole thing for a game of soldiers and gave up acting.
1.1 [no object] (sod off) [in imperative] Go away.
Example sentences
  • End of interview, so would you all kindly sod off without walking all over my garden?
  • The overwhelming attitude is, ‘Give us your money and sod off.’
  • Listen politely, smile, nod, then sod off and carry on as before.
1.2 (as adjective sodding) Used as a general term of contempt.
Example sentences
  • Thoughts are turning to autumn leaves fluttering gently to the ground - propelled by hurricane force winds and endless sodding rain.
  • This was followed by the sort of party when I find myself talking to someone who clearly knows who I am, and to whom I would clearly have a lot of old-friendly backchat to make, if only I could recognise their sodding face.
  • Finding myself watching Monarch of the sodding Glen whilst ironing my work clothes has drummed it in like nothing else that I have got to do something, else I will be stuck in this miserable existence for ever.

Phrases

sod all

1
vulgar slang, chiefly British Absolutely nothing.
Example sentences
  • But, much as I love and appreciate good wine, I just know sod all about it.
  • And the Arsenal's just a ghost town - a few army people milling about, lots of builders, but sod all else.
  • ‘Work’ is an exaggeration as well, we did sod all.

Origin

Early 19th century: abbreviation of sodomite.

Definition of sod in:

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