Definition of solicitor in English:

solicitor

Syllabification: so·lic·i·tor
Pronunciation: /səˈlisədər
 
/

noun

1North American A person who tries to obtain business orders, advertising, etc.; a canvasser.
More example sentences
  • Telephone solicitors have no sense of privacy nor know when to call.
  • And if that's not bad enough, now I've got telephone solicitors calling me for charity donations.
  • I think I have found the best way to handle telephone solicitors.
2North American The chief law officer of a city, town, or government department.
More example sentences
  • The president of the United States and the vice president of the United States should not be the solicitors in chief.
  • Chief Operating Officer David Sanko announced that Guy Matthews, Bucks County’s first full-time county solicitor, has submitted a letter of intent to retire.
  • He was chosen the first solicitor of the city, and a member of the first board of trustees of the public library.
2.1British A member of the legal profession qualified to deal with conveyancing, the drawing up of wills, and other legal matters.
More example sentences
  • He had the benefit of legal aid to instruct, and did instruct, solicitors and counsel to represent him at his trial.
  • The case concerned a claim for damages arising from the negligence of a solicitor instructed in a conveyancing transaction.
  • She had apparently instructed solicitors to deal with the matter on her behalf.

Origin

late Middle English (denoting an agent or deputy): from Old French solliciteur, from solliciter (see solicit).

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