There are 2 definitions of spark in English:

spark1

Syllabification: spark
Pronunciation: /spärk
 
/

noun

1A small fiery particle thrown off from a fire, alight in ashes, or produced by striking together two hard surfaces such as stone or metal.
More example sentences
  • Two stones rubbed themselves together and a spark lit and a fire was kindled on the wood piece.
  • She shaded her eyes and crouched beside him, the fire crackling and sending sparks into the morning air.
  • The Duke threw his piece of meat into the fire, causing sparks, and got up.
1.1A light produced by a sudden disruptive electrical discharge through the air.
1.2An electrical discharge serving to ignite the explosive mixture in an internal combustion engine.
1.3A small bright object or point: there was a spark of light
Synonyms
flash, glint, twinkle, flicker, flare, pinprick
2A trace of a specified quality or intense feeling: a tiny spark of anger flared within her
More example sentences
  • She squeezed lightly and I turned to face her, saw the compassion and grief and the tiny spark of hope burning in those icy blue eyes.
  • That thought kindled a tiny spark of hope in Sorsha.
  • No one in this film shows a spark of charismatic quality, much less any halfhearted attempts at believable characterization.
Synonyms
2.1A sense of liveliness and excitement: there was a spark between them at their first meeting
More example sentences
  • The job just didn't provide me with the spark, excitement, and the security I needed.
  • Nothing has a spark or spirit of contemporary Aphex Twin.
  • What was the initial spark that got you interested in acting?

verb

Back to top  
1 [no object] Emit sparks of fire or electricity: the ignition sparks as soon as the gas is turned on
More example sentences
  • The fire crackled and sparked, sending small bits of flame into the crisp night air.
  • The fire popped and sparked as if trying to answer, but it had only temporarily broken the silence.
  • Fire sparked, rose to a peak and danced under heated fumes that rose, tore at its periphery and crumbled to ashes.
1.1Produce sparks at the point where an electric circuit is interrupted.
2 [with object] Ignite: the explosion sparked a fire
More example sentences
  • If you get enough methane in a basement, you can spark an explosion.
  • The Reavers sat near the fire pit they had gathered; one lit the kindling, sparking a roaring fire in the middle of the morning.
  • If you have sufficient physical energy but are feeling dull and languid, you need a movement pattern with some creative fire to spark your life force.
2.1Provide the stimulus for (a dramatic event or process): the severity of the plan sparked off street protests
More example sentences
  • The 1905 Russian Revolution was sparked off by a peaceful protest held on January 22nd.
  • The 1998 Biodevastation Gathering sparked subsequent events in Seattle, New Delhi, Boston, San Diego and Toronto.
  • I'm always on the lookout for imagery that will spark my painting process.
Synonyms
cause, give rise to, lead to, occasion, bring about, start, initiate, precipitate, prompt, trigger (off), provoke, stimulate, stir up

Origin

Old English spærca, spearca, of unknown origin.

Phrases

spark out

British informal Completely unconscious: I think he would knock Bowe spark out
More example sentences
  • I didn't just stop him last time: I knocked him spark out.
  • Two years ago, big Manny Siaca, now a light-heavyweight, was ahead on points against Mitchell before the champion knocked him spark out in the last round.
  • One of Ali's greatest admirers is the man who once came very close to being knocked spark out on live television by the selfsame Ali.

sparks fly

An encounter becomes heated or lively: sparks always fly when you two get together
More example sentences
  • Olschok seems more preoccupied by attempting to thrill the audience than he his trying at make sure sparks fly between the two leads.
  • Sure Ben was nice and held me when I needed comforting but Trevor's touch made sparks fly for some reason.
  • I at least want the opportunity, and the chance to see if the sparks fly like I have been dreaming they will!

Derivatives

sparker

noun
More example sentences
  • Matt and I had each brought along a box of sparkers and a lighter to use on the boat.
  • Elise sat down next to him and proffered a sparker.
  • Consequently, this book is most suited as a reference and idea sparker.

sparkless

adjective
More example sentences
  • At Zamsure, Young Buffaloes and their fellow servicemen Riflemen played to a goalless draw in a sparkless match which both sides seemed to be content with though Buffaloes needed to win to be comfortable.
  • Such was the sparkless nature of the game that if either goalkeeper had gone off to rest in the Woodlands stadium terraces, he would never have been missed.

sparky

adjective
More example sentences
  • Philip Osment's sparky translation briefly announces the content of each of the play's 13 episodes.
  • Streep has moved way beyond her reputation for mastery of wildly different accents, and is now enjoying a burst of sparky creativity in her fifties, typified by her energetic, mesmerising portrayal of these multiple personalities.
  • Mawdsley's production is flabby, and only highlights the play's creaky construction, but the cast are good value and make the most of the often sparky dialogue.

Definition of spark in:

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Word of the day premonition
Pronunciation: ˌprɛməˈnɪʃ(ə)n
noun
a strong feeling that something will happen …

There are 2 definitions of spark in English:

spark2

Syllabification: spark
Pronunciation: /
 
spärk/
archaic

noun

A lively young fellow.

verb

[no object] Back to top  
Engage in courtship.

Origin

early 16th century: probably a figurative use of spark1.

Derivatives

sparkish

adjective

Definition of spark in: