Definition of spout in English:

spout

Syllabification: spout
Pronunciation: /spout
 
/

noun

1A tube or lip projecting from a container, through which liquid can be poured: a teapot with a chipped spout
More example sentences
  • Paper gable-top cartons are filled and sealed with advanced equipment that uses extended shelf-life technology and has the capability of applying convenient pour spouts to half-gallon cartons.
  • Previously, we packaged our product in a paperboard carton that had a pour spout with a screw-on cap.
  • Once the boxes are filled, a pour spout is installed on the top of the package.
Synonyms
1.1A pipe or trough through which water may be carried away or from which it can flow out.
More example sentences
  • The arms of the double-row colonnade embrace a circular fountain with a brass spout cast from an old terra-cotta finial on the nearby Wrigley Building, one of Chicago's most cherished older buildings.
  • Roofs are of corrugated iron drained by copper spouts and downpipes.
  • Kids just love climbing along and jumping into water spouts, especially if the spouts are sometimes unpredictable.
1.2A sloping trough for conveying something to a lower level; a chute.
1.3 historical A lift in a pawnshop used to convey pawned items up for storage.
2A stream of liquid issuing from somewhere with great force: the tall spouts of geysers
More example sentences
  • After a quick ineffectual glance up at Anderson's house, she ran towards the driveway, splashing spouts of mud and rainwater up at her jeans.
2.1The plume of water vapor ejected from the blowhole of a whale: the spout of an occasional whale
More example sentences
  • When you're not scanning the ocean with your binoculars for a whale spout to the west, you can watch squirrels and birds scamper about to the east.
  • But although the ship moves quickly, and the men are eager to find the whale making the spout, they are unable to see it again.
  • It is last seen pursuing a wave that the men aboard have mistaken for a whale spout.

verb

[with object] Back to top  
1Send out (liquid) forcibly in a stream: volcanoes spouted ash and lava
1.1 [no object] (Of a liquid) flow out forcibly in a stream: blood was spouting from the cuts on my hand
Synonyms
spurt, gush, spew, erupt, shoot, squirt, spray;
disgorge, discharge, emit, belch forth
1.2(Of a whale or dolphin) eject (water vapor and air) through its blowhole.
More example sentences
  • The artist's contribution was another flag installation - the old South African flag and the ANC flag knotted together, placed in a fountain in the center of Paris that had dolphins and lions spouting water.
2Express (one’s views or ideas) in a lengthy, declamatory, and unreflecting way: he was spouting platitudes about animal rights [no object]: they like to spout off at each other
More example sentences
  • When you're speaking on behalf of other people you cease to be spouting your own views.
  • You are relegated to spouting opinion, and nothing more.
  • How else would he have learned to spout such preposterous notions as universal love?
Synonyms
hold forth, sound off, go on, talk at length, expatiate
informal mouth off, speechify, spiel

Origin

Middle English (as a verb): from Middle Dutch spouten, from an imitative base shared by Old Norse spýta 'to spit'.

Phrases

up the spout

British informal
1No longer working, or unlikely to be useful or successful.
More example sentences
  • Now, with the roads clogged, the trains up the spout and hot desking presenting a daily strain of competing for your actual workstation, the thought of staying at home to work has never been more appealing.
  • Of course, the alternative is that the authorities turn a blind eye to drug use in brothels, and then your whole criminal justice system goes up the spout.
  • By the time you have eventually caught one, appointments in town have been missed and one's careful planning for the day has gone up the spout.
2(Of a woman) pregnant.
More example sentences
  • ‘I'm up the spout so you'd better hike child benefit,’ were not the words used, which is a pity as it would have livened things up a little.
  • I hear Daly is now up the spout through her unholy union with Kaye.
  • Turn again to this lot, and their sympathetic reaction to some self-proclaimed religious freak who has been put up the spout out of wedlock.
3Pawned: by Friday, half his belongings were up the spout

Derivatives

spouted

adjective

spouter

noun
More example sentences
  • A response one of my Zen teachers often used when confronted by an emptiness spouter was: ‘Does emptiness feel pain?’
  • What really interests me about rhetoric like this is that the spouter sees homosexuality as a vice; by that he is intimating that it is a very bad thing, and the choice of the weak, but also it is enjoyable.
  • If you still prefer the soil-less method, I would encourage you to invest in a spouter that has multiple layers and trays with drainage holes.

spoutless

adjective
More example sentences
  • The use of the spoutless cup should continue for 3 weeks also.
  • In a spoutless container, the blade extends from the top lip horizontally inside the container for up to two inches, then diagonally down to the inside of the container.
  • What are those sets of handleless saucepans and of spoutless teapots?

Definition of spout in:

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Word of the day retroflex
Pronunciation: ˈrɛtrə(ʊ)flɛks
adjective
turned backwards