Definition of staccato in English:

staccato

Syllabification: stac·ca·to
Pronunciation: /stəˈkädō
 
/
chiefly Music

adverb& adjective

With each sound or note sharply detached or separated from the others: [as adjective]: a staccato rhythm Compare with legato, marcato.
More example sentences
  • The piano started up; soft, staccato notes filled the room and chased away the dull rumble from the backstage area.
  • On the piano, James was not delicate nor mysterious at all - his playing was stuttered and fast, something rushing forth in staccato bursts that suggest supreme agitation or even anger.
  • Retention of a naturally compact hand through early release of selected notes and judicious use of staccato touch is a potent technique.

noun (plural staccatos)

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1A piece or passage marked to be performed staccato.
More example sentences
  • We play opposite articulations: legato in staccato passages, staccato in legato sections.
  • ‘Distant Drums’ is marked by a staccato, open-fifth ostinato pattern in the left hand, over which the chromatic-based melody reigns in the right hand.
  • Years later when Beth played Mozart Sonatas and Chopin Nocturnes, we experimented with putting down the keys in various ways to get the velvety legatos or sparkling staccatos called for in the music.
1.1A noise or speech resembling a series of short, detached musical notes: her heels made a rapid staccato on the polished boards
More example sentences
  • Faily looked around at his gang, and his voice changed from the flat monotone of his recitation of imprinted details to the sharp staccato of his orders.
  • The heavy staccato of footfalls behind her sounded a bit odd.
  • She'd sit at the terminal, frowning, cigarette burning in the tray, tapping a rapid staccato.

Origin

Italian, literally 'detached'.

Definition of staccato in:

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Pronunciation: ˈrɛtrə(ʊ)flɛks
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