Definition of stalemate in English:

stalemate

Syllabification: stale·mate
Pronunciation: /ˈstālˌmāt
 
/

noun

Chess
1A position counting as a draw, in which a player is not in check but cannot move except into check.
More example sentences
  • The often-criticized rule that stalemate is a draw also increases Chess's drama, by giving a player hope of salvaging something even after he can no longer win.
  • Throwing in the proverbial towel is, however, not an option according to the rules of this particular contest, which state that the game can only end with checkmate or stalemate.
  • So don't tell me that this game will eventually come to a stalemate like chess, where the player turns over his king and quits.
1.1A situation in which further action or progress by opposing or competing parties seems impossible: the war had again reached stalemate
More example sentences
  • A mediator can break this stalemate and get the parties talking.
  • Workers and management at a Great Harwood engineering depot have reached stalemate over pay claims.
  • Now officials have warned that if negotiations reach stalemate today they will resort to legal action.
Synonyms
deadlock, impasse, standoff;
draw, tie, dead heat

verb

[with object] Back to top  
Bring to or cause to reach stalemate: (as adjective stalemated) the currently stalemated peace talks
More example sentences
  • This article concludes by suggesting ways in which the currently stalemated debate might be revitalized by principled interventions from scholars and concerned citizens.
  • Nick managed to move his battered body quickly enough to launch his own counter-blast, successfully stalemating the battleship's beam.
  • Fitzsimmons notes that prior to 4 August, debates in the National Assembly were largely stalemated between those legislators who wanted reform and those who wanted to preserve the status quo.

Origin

mid 18th century: from obsolete stale (from Anglo-Norman French estale 'position', from estaler 'be placed') + mate2.

Definition of stalemate in:

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Word of the day retroflex
Pronunciation: ˈrɛtrə(ʊ)flɛks
adjective
turned backwards