Definition of stoke in English:

stoke

Syllabification: stoke
Pronunciation: /stōk
 
/

verb

[with object]
1Add coal or other solid fuel to (a fire, furnace, or boiler).
More example sentences
  • On washdays, the tub was filled with cold water using buckets, and a wood or coal fire was stoked up.
  • The furnaces that fed them fizzled out long ago, the coal that stoked the fires lies unexcavated in flooded mines.
  • Leaning over, she took hold of an iron stick and with it poked at the fire, stoking the dying flames.
Synonyms
add fuel to, keep burning, tend
1.1Encourage or incite (a strong emotion or tendency): his composure had the effect of stoking her anger
More example sentences
  • Unanswered, its effect is to stoke resentment and encourage conflict.
  • Exactly 100 years ago this week, Wales was in the midst of a fervent religious revival led by a young Methodist, stoking fanatical excitement and emotional excesses.
  • These ads are geared to stoke voter emotions and fears to hammer a candidate on a controversial issue.
1.2 (often as adjective stoked) informal Excite or thrill: when they told me I was on the team, I was stoked
More example sentences
  • They were so stoked to be playing the festival; it was fun watching them have fun.
  • I'm so stoked to hear that government agencies are spying on us for our corporate overlords!
  • "I'm super stoked to be going, " he said.
1.3 [no object] informal Consume a large quantity of food or drink to give one energy: Carol was at the coffee machine, stoking up for the day
More example sentences
  • It is a big, brash, gutsy engine, stoking up a lot of energy for seemingly little effort, and it is just perfect for a big, brash, gutsy car.
  • The following morning, after stoking up well for the day with a self-service full English breakfast, we headed for Our Dynamic Earth, a £34 million project built on three levels.
  • Parents trying to feed their nestlings can keep their own bellies filled by stoking up at our suet and seed feeders, but as for their young… we don't know.

Origin

mid 17th century: back-formation from stoker.

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