Definition of stolid in English:

stolid

Syllabification: stol·id
Pronunciation: /ˈstälid
 
/

adjective

(Of a person) calm, dependable, and showing little emotion or animation.
More example sentences
  • If you want a symbol of Britishness, look no further than the stolid calm that came over London last Thursday.
  • I remember her as being a rather slow, stolid girl.
  • To British ears, your claim not to read polls sounds like stolid indifference to public opinion, not moral strength and political courage.
Synonyms
impassive, phlegmatic, unemotional, cool, calm, placid, unexcitable; dependable; unimaginative, dull

Origin

late 16th century: from obsolete French stolide or Latin stolidus (perhaps related to stultus 'foolish').

Derivatives

stolidity

Pronunciation: /stəˈliditē/
noun
More example sentences
  • Neutrals in the 38,000 crowd had decided that Fiji flair was more worthy of support than Scottish stolidity, but the fact is that Fiji are on their way home and Scotland advance to Sydney and a meeting with Australia on Saturday.
  • He lives in the whitewashed croft his family have owned for generations and while there is the stolidity of a Highlander about him, with a latent strength in the broad shoulders and a stout work ethic, the blue eyes still twinkle.
  • The perpetrators' faces had the fleshy stolidity of candlewax.

stolidly

adverb
More example sentences
  • It hadn't stopped Leila's father becoming a flying instructor, but her mother never entered a plane after she heard this story, stolidly embroidering, two feet on the ground, while her husband waggled his wings overhead.
  • He stood stolidly enough in the dock, but in life he lost his temper, cried easily - cried in front of the vice-principal of the school where he worked; cried in front of the police when they came to ask questions.
  • The ladies had to stand while the seated males stolidly ignored the courtesies their fathers would have observed (presumably in the same carriages).

stolidness

noun
More example sentences
  • In the lead, the muscled-up actor has never looked better, and even his stolidness works here because it gives her something to play off, to tease.
  • He is as fine as stolid gets - way ahead of a perennial favorite like Spencer Tracy - and his stolidness may be why he's now a general-purpose star.
  • If we simply want the clarity without the alterity and possibility of deferral, our writing fixes into stolidness and cliché, and even a sense of constriction, while also limiting the reader's response and imagination.

Definition of stolid in:

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