Definition of strophe in English:

strophe

Syllabification: stro·phe
Pronunciation: /ˈstrōfē
 
/

noun

  • 1The first section of an ancient Greek choral ode or of one division of it. Compare with antistrophe and epode ( sense 2).
    More example sentences
    • Most celebrated were the Epodes, songs in simple strophes usually made up of a hexameter or iambic trimeter plus one or two shorter cola.
    • For example, in Schubert's Heidenröslein three verses, or strophes, are set to the same melody, with no alterations to the voice part or the piano accompaniment.
    • It puts an end to the cyclic character of the six strophes and opens the door back into quotidian time.
  • 1.1A structural division of a poem containing stanzas of varying line-length, especially an ode or free verse poem.
    More example sentences
    • In some strophes of the poem I tried to depict the tempest, followed by the calm of the sea.
    • He believes that the syllable count of poetic lines, strophes, stanzas, and poems was essential to the writing of biblical poetry.
    • An ‘aria’ was distinguished from a ‘madrigal’ in having a strophic text, with the same music, or a variation of it, set to each strophe.

Derivatives

strophic

Pronunciation: /-fik, ˈsträ-/
adjective
More example sentences
  • His poems are written in regular stanzas, either strophic or triadic.
  • The more reflective, sentimental, strophic Cancion is represented to a lesser extent.
  • There is an almost ritual use of repetition in the strophic or modified strophic songs.

Origin

early 17th century: from Greek strophē, literally 'turning', from strephein 'to turn'; the term originally denoted a movement from right to left made by a Greek chorus, or lines of choral song recited during this.

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