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sublate

Syllabification: sub·late
Pronunciation: /səˈblāt
 
/

Definition of sublate in English:

verb

[with object] Philosophy
Assimilate (a smaller entity) into a larger one: fragmented aspects of the self the subject is unable to sublate
More example sentences
  • In Middle Passage slavery can be thought of as an ontic wound, and all moral judgment is sublated because of a general deconstruction of values in the face of the universal condition of man.
  • It affirmed what Stanley calls ‘the ontology of objective nature’ at the expense of a worldview sublating nature to Spirit.
  • The overt sexual content has not been sublated by form or symbolism.

Origin

mid 19th century: from Latin sublat- 'taken away', from sub- 'from below' + lat- (from the stem of tollere 'take away').

Derivatives

sublation

1
Pronunciation: /-ˈblāSHən/
noun
Example sentences
  • Bloechl's criticism focuses upon the Hegelian sublation he finds in Gibbs' effort to reconcile the dialectical opposition between philosophy and Judaism.
  • Bourdieu's analysis is the sublation of Flaubert's novel: what it keeps is the book's true hidden nature, and all that it sloughs off is chaff.
  • What is strikingly interesting and appropriate is that Marx's surpassing of Hegel on this matter is a simultaneous retention and is, therefore, a true sublation.

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Pronunciation: ˈtɛnɪbrəs
adjective
dark; shadowy or obscure