There are 2 definitions of swallow in English:

swallow1

Syllabification: swal·low
Pronunciation: /ˈswälō
 
/

verb

[with object]
  • 1Cause or allow (something, especially food or drink) to pass down the throat: she swallowed a mouthful slowly
    More example sentences
    • On Saturday, December 4, she discovered she could not swallow food or drink, and the next day her husband took her to casualty at Pontefract.
    • When he felt the man's hand lifting his head, he swallowed whatever food or drink he was given.
    • Normally I like to have a beer or more but the sensation in the back of my throat when I swallowed beer this time was really strange.
    Synonyms
    eat, gulp down, consume, devour, put away; ingest, assimilate; drink, guzzle, quaff, imbibe, sup, slug
    informal polish off, swig, chug, swill, down, scoff
  • 1.1 [no object] Perform the muscular movement of the esophagus required to do this, especially through fear or nervousness: she swallowed hard, sniffing back her tears
    More example sentences
    • Saran swallowed, fear and nervousness suddenly finding their way back.
    • Being about thirty feet from the ground, Raiana slowly looked down, and swallowed hard, her fear of heights kicking in.
    • Micah swallowed hard to control the fear inside of her.
  • 1.2Put up with or meekly accept (something insulting or unwelcome): he seemed ready to swallow any insult
    More example sentences
    • Do they assume that women who practise faith are a docile lot, meekly swallowing the built-in injustices in their respective religions?
    • ‘Get on with it,’ Blancard pushed, swallowing the insult he had been about ready to spout off at her.
    • Apparently, these broadcasters believe that listeners are incapable of handling subversive music, but are ready to swallow euphemisms.
    Synonyms
  • 1.3Believe unquestioningly (a lie or unlikely assertion): she had swallowed his story hook, line, and sinker
    More example sentences
    • The crook-Conservatives lie to the idiot-conservatives who swallow the lies hook, line and sinker.
    • They've realised that Jonathan Swift was close to the truth when he said that ‘all politicians ultimately die of swallowing their own lies’.
    • Big media, with a few honorable exceptions, are respectfully swallowing the big lies.
    Synonyms
    believe, credit, accept, trust
    informal fall for, buy, go for, 'swallow hook, line, and sinker'
  • 1.4Resist expressing (a feeling) or uttering (words): he swallowed his pride
    More example sentences
    • He bravely helps his master and swallows his utter hatred of Smeagol long enough for them to use the creature as a guide.
    • Depressed, we bit our tongue, swallowed our pride and voted Libertarian.
    • Maybe my life would change for the better if I bit my tongue, swallowed my pride and didn't rise to any form of bait.
    Synonyms
    restrain, repress, suppress, hold back, fight back; overcome, check, control, curb, rein in; silence, muffle, stifle, smother, hide, bottle up
    informal keep a/the lid on
  • 1.5Take in and cause to disappear; engulf: the dark mist swallowed her up
    More example sentences
    • The child, like so many thousands of others in a tragedy unfolding across 10 countries, disappeared, swallowed by a sea that had not been so cruel for more than a century.
    • An explosion of smoke engulfed him, swallowing his body in a flume of colors.
    • The night swallowed him as he disappeared into the trees.
  • 1.6Completely use up (money or resources): debts swallowed up most of the money he had gotten for the house
    More example sentences
    • Unfortunately, most of the money is swallowed up in bureaucracy and the production of meaningless consultancy reports which benefit nobody.
    • Tshwete should also explain in detail ‘how many resources were swallowed up by what was always a wild-goose chase’.
    • The Met were rightfully hammered and shaken up into a better police force although sadly most of the compensation was swallowed up by feverish vain legal teams.

noun

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  • 1An act of swallowing something, especially food or drink: he downed his drink in one swallow
    More example sentences
    • He handed me his glass and I drank down his last swallow.
    • In another, the sufferer drinks several swallows of water while an accomplice presses on both ear flaps (technically called the tragus).
    • Their glasses clinked lightly, and then they both drank several swallows.
  • 1.1An amount of something swallowed in one action: he said he’d like just a swallow of pie
    More example sentences
    • He took a swallow of Tab and rose, taking his bowl to the sink.
    • He took a deep breath and a swallow of water from his mug.
    • Thilda shrugged her shoulders and took a swallow of her mead.

Derivatives

swallowable

adjective
More example sentences
  • But if anything, people seemed to appreciate us putting the text in a more swallowable form.
  • ‘Right now we're developing these chips for brain stimulators, bladder control devices, and even a swallowable camera,’ notes Pelletier.
  • Dr. Annette Smith and colleagues at the University College London have successfully tested in humans a small swallowable gut camera that can be steered around in the gut.

swallower

noun
More example sentences
  • He has every intention of fighting off any challenge to his title as Ireland's champion oyster swallower!
  • Harold Smith, 48, a compulsive fork swallower, has indeed managed to dodge jail time in spite of his conviction on a drug rap.
  • More than double the number of drug ‘mules’, known as ‘swallowers’ because they carry the potentially lethal drugs in packages in their stomach, have been arrested in Jamaica.

Origin

Old English swelgan, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch zwelgen and German schwelgen.

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Word of the day astrogation
Pronunciation: ˌastrə(ʊ)ˈgeɪʃ(ə)n
noun
(in science fiction) navigation in outer space

There are 2 definitions of swallow in English:

swallow2

Syllabification: swal·low
Pronunciation: /
 
ˈswälō/

noun

  • A migratory swift-flying songbird with a forked tail and long pointed wings, feeding on insects in flight.
    • Family Hirundinidae: several genera, in particular Hirundo, and numerous species, including the widespread barn swallow (H. rustica)
    More example sentences
    • The central aim of our study was to demonstrate that both natural and sexual selection have been important in shaping the tail streamer of the barn swallow.
    • Most studies trying to identify the function of external tail feathers in the barn swallow have focused on males; much less attention has been paid to females.
    • The barn swallow is an approximately 20-g passerine, migratory bird that feeds on flying insects captured on the wing.

Phrases

one swallow does not make a summer

proverb A single fortunate event does not mean that what follows will also be good.
More example sentences
  • One swallow does not make a summer, even if this series made ours.
  • When Sligo Rovers defeated Galway I thought to myself that one swallow does not make a summer and the game against Dundalk would be the acid test.
  • A lot of my horses have been wrong, but hopefully we are on the way back - though one swallow does not make a summer.

Origin

Old English swealwe, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch zwaluw and German Schwalbe.

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