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syntagm

Syllabification: syn·tagm
Pronunciation: /ˈsinˌtam
 
/
(also syntagma /sinˈtaɡmə/)

Definition of syntagm in English:

noun (plural syntagms or syntagmas or syntagmata /sinˈtaɡmətə/)

1A linguistic unit consisting of a set of linguistic forms (phonemes, words, or phrases) that are in a sequential relationship to one another. Often contrasted with paradigm.
Example sentences
  • For Saussure, syntagms are a ‘horizontal’ dimension of language, and are the regular and typical patterns of structure in the language system.
  • The tone, mood, fast-paced interjections, and witty syntagms of the 1940s vernacular are very difficult to convey in the several lines of subtitled translation.
  • In written etic discourse, which is, after all, a linear string of syntagms, one may need to break off in order to ‘enflesh’ a character.
1.1The relationship between two syntagms.

Origin

mid 17th century: via late Latin from Greek suntagma, from suntassein 'arrange together'.

Definition of syntagm in:

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