Definition of tabard in English:

tabard

Syllabification: tab·ard
Pronunciation: /ˈtabərd
 
/

noun

  • 1A sleeveless jerkin consisting only of front and back pieces with a hole for the head.
    More example sentences
    • He was wearing boots, blue trousers and a distinctive fluorescent sleeveless tabard.
    • We tried wearing colourful tabards and polo shirts but no one wanted to go the full way and move into these ‘child friendly’ outfits.
    • He was wearing a dark coloured bobble hat and a dark jacket with a fluorescent yellow sleeveless tabard over the top.
  • 1.1 historical A coarse sleeveless garment worn as the outer dress of medieval peasants and clerics, or worn as a surcoat over armor.
    More example sentences
    • His ceremonial dress included a splendid tabard, bearing the royal coat of arms, along with a sword, black leggings and buckled shoes.
    • The tabard was sleeveless, showing the white long sleeved shirt that the person wore under it, the end of which tucked away underneath simple iron gauntlets.
    • Shoppers flocked from far and wide to enjoy the medieval atmosphere, and shop staff and stallholders got into the spirit of the event by donning crested tabards.
  • 1.2A herald’s official coat emblazoned with the arms of the sovereign.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French tabart, of unknown origin.

More definitions of tabard

Definition of tabard in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day coloratura
Pronunciation: ˌkɒlərəˈtjʊərə
noun
elaborate ornamentation of a vocal melody