Definition of though in English:

though

Syllabification: though
Pronunciation: /T͟Hō
 
/

conjunction

1Despite the fact that; although: though they were speaking in undertones, Philip could hear them
More example sentences
  • Haylage is becoming more popular and though it is more expensive than hay, has a higher feed value.
  • In fact, though the alarm has some basis in fact, it should be treated with scepticism.
  • The fact on which he now relies is that though he stole, he did not in fact threaten violence.
1.1 [with modal] Even if (introducing a possibility): you will be informed of its progress, slow though that may be
More example sentences
  • We also have many ways of saying that, though something may, in fact, not be the case, it could be.
  • Trivial though facts may be, he wanted to know what he was up against.
1.2However; but (introducing something opposed to or qualifying what has just been said): her first name was Rose, though no one called her that
More example sentences
  • The Japanese still have a chance of qualifying, though they need at least another goal.
  • He tried it in a local chalk pit where he usually rode and was pleased with it, though he found brake problems.
  • Two bombs hit the ship, neither of which exploded, though one man died in the raid.
Synonyms
although, even though/if, in spite of the fact that, despite the fact that, notwithstanding (the fact) that, for all that

adverb

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However (indicating that a factor qualifies or imposes restrictions on what was said previously): I was hunting for work. Jobs were scarce though
More example sentences
  • I wish them all the best though, and fully appreciate the time and effort they put in.
  • The service is not slow though, we get a jug of iced water right away and a young waiter soon arrives to take our order.
  • In these opening weeks of the season, though, he will remain a figure of possibility.
Synonyms
nevertheless, nonetheless, even so, however, be that as it may, for all that, despite that, having said that
informal still and all

Origin

Old English thēah, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch and German doch; superseded in Middle English by forms from Old Norse thó, thau.

Usage

On the differences in use between though and although, see although (usage).

Phrases

as though

see as1.

even though

see even1.

Definition of though in:

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