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thud

Syllabification: thud
Pronunciation: /THəd
 
/

Definition of thud in English:

noun

A dull, heavy sound, such as that made by an object falling to the ground: Jean heard the thud of the closing door
More example sentences
  • The elevator slammed into the ground with a dull thud, and the doors screeched open.
  • He and the coffee table hit the ground with a loud thud and the sound for breaking wood.
  • A little later we hear two dull thuds echoing across the valley as one of the Apaches fires its missiles.

verb (thuds, thudding, thudded)

[no object] Back to top  
Move, fall, or strike something with a dull, heavy sound: the bullets thudded into the dusty ground
More example sentences
  • He tumbled down the incline, head over heels amid falling debris, and thudded against something soft.
  • We were flying over the land as the pounding of the hooves thudded in our hearts.
  • His heavy boots thudded against the pavement of a desolate road as he kept on walking in a semiconscious daze.

Origin

late Middle English (originally Scots): probably from Old English thyddan 'to thrust, push'; related to thoden 'violent wind.' The noun is recorded first denoting a sudden blast or gust of wind, later the sound of a thunderclap, whence a dull, heavy sound. The verb dates from the early 16th century.

Phrases

with a thud

1
Used to describe a sudden and disillusioning reminder of reality in contrast to someone’s dreams or aspirations: dropouts have now come back down to earth with a thud
More example sentences
  • But she cautioned that David Nalbandian could bring Murray down to earth with a thud.
  • The result is articles from happy land that lift their readers into the air and drop them with a thud once a purchase is made.
  • Alas, you are brought down to the earth with a sudden thud as finally you confront the cost of an overseas education.

Words that rhyme with thud

blood, bud, crud, cud, dud, flood, Judd, mud, rudd, scud, spud, stud, sudd

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