There are 2 definitions of ton in English:

ton1

Syllabification: ton
Pronunciation: /tən
 
/
(abbreviation: t also tn)

noun

1 (also short ton) chiefly North American A unit of weight equal to 2,000 pounds avoirdupois (907.19 kg).
More example sentences
  • Units exported or imported were reported only in pounds, gallons, bales, bushels, short tons, dozens, bags, crates and bunches, etc., depending on the commodity.
  • U.S. Marine Corps, Air Force and Army aircraft delivered several million gallons of fuel and short tons of supplies to support the operations.
  • Calico's annual output was accordingly very small through 1888, probably not exceeding 250 short tons, or 500,000 pounds, valued at no more than $33,500.
1.1 (also long ton) A unit of weight equal to 2,240 pounds avoirdupois (1016.05 kg).
More example sentences
  • The film details the story of what might happen if an atomic bomb equal to 20,000 tons of TNT were exploded at 1,000 ft above a British city of half a million people.
  • Couriers ride the trikes with attached trailers, the strongest of which can take a quarter of a ton in weight, from our Walmgate offices with the latest copies of the newspaper and ferry them to various destinations.
  • The feats achieved in this film make spectacular viewing, with tiny lorries hauling sacks of cement totalling several tons in weight as they climb fantastic Scottish mountain tracks.
1.2 short for metric ton.
1.3 (also displacement ton) A unit of measurement of a ship’s weight representing the weight of water it displaces, equal to 2,240 pounds or 35 cubic feet (0.99 cu m).
More example sentences
  • The four ships will replace the smaller LSLs of the Sir Galahad and Sir Bedivere classes, which displace between 6,700 tons and 8,585 tons fully loaded.
  • The ships displaced between 425 and 440 tons fully loaded, with a speed of 15 knots.
  • River-class ships are just under 80 metres long and displace 1,700 tons fully loaded.
1.4 (also freight ton) A unit of weight or volume of sea cargo, equal to a metric ton (1,000 kg) or 40 cubic feet.
More example sentences
  • In all we seized 40,000 tons of illegal cargo, mostly oil.
  • They are about 135 feet long; each has a crew of 14 sailors and can haul 125 tons of cargo.
  • There are 17,000 tons of cargo in the Chilean port of Arica that cannot be transported because the railroad between Arica and La Paz has been paralyzed.
1.5 (also gross ton) A unit of gross internal capacity, equal to 100 cubic feet (2.83 cu. m).
More example sentences
  • Another mouse click brings up a table listing each individual bunker's location, its area in square feet, and its sand capacity in cubic feet, cubic yards and tons.
  • The International Maritime Organization already requires units above three hundred gross tons to carry Inmarsat-C, as part of the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System and in accordance with the Safety of Life at Sea Convention.
  • They also welded together 5,200 merchant ships totalling 39 million gross tons.
1.6 (also net or register ton) An equivalent unit of net internal capacity.
More example sentences
  • With only 940 passengers, you get to know your shipmates; but at 49,400 gross register tons, she offers all the on-board options one could desire - sans the gimmicks of the new floating resorts.
  • U.S. citizenship is still required for an owner to document a vessel and the vessel must be at least five net tons.
  • Upon entering service, the QM2 becomes the largest and longest passenger ship in the world at 150,000 gross register tons (8,000 more than the Voyager of the Seas) and 1,132 feet from stem to stern (exceeding the Norway by 97 feet).
1.7A unit of refrigerating power able to freeze 2,000 pounds of water at 0°C in 24 hours.
More example sentences
  • The plant would produce 150 megawatts of electricity and 20,000 tons of cooling.
1.8A measure of capacity for various materials, especially 40 cubic feet of timber.
More example sentences
  • In 1772 one of the side branches was thrown down in a violent gale and, on being measured, was found to contain about five tons of timber.
  • Sources in the industry say that about 2,000 tons of timber leave Mayo and the North West every week for the south eastern processing industry.
  • At present the forests there move between 80000 and 100000 tons of timber a year by road.
2 (usually a ton of/tons of) informal A large number or amount: all of a sudden I had tons of friends that bag of yours weighs a ton
More example sentences
  • The store sells a ton of books and, just as important, serves as a focus and catalyst for a community of passionate readers.
  • He sold a ton of books and videos based on his fearmongering statements that the lights would turn out at midnight on January 1st, 2000.
  • My friend brought along a ton of gymnastic books and magazines.

Origin

Middle English: variant of tun, both spellings being used for the container and the weight. The senses were differentiated in the late 17th century.

Phrases

like a ton of bricks

see brick.

weigh a ton

informal Be extremely heavy: his boots were completely waterlogged and weighed a ton
More example sentences
  • To start with, the bag weighs a ton.
  • The book, titled To Be or Not to Be, weighs a ton!
  • I'm gonna need a forklift because all the baggage weighs a ton

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Word of the day semblance
Pronunciation: ˈsɛmbləns
noun
the outward appearance or apparent form of something…

There are 2 definitions of ton in English:

ton2

Syllabification: ton
Pronunciation: /tôN
 
/

noun

1Fashionable style or distinction.
More example sentences
  • Whereas the rest of the comedy takes place in closed drawing, dressing, and dining-rooms, and uses a small cast, the party suddenly opens up spatially into the world of ton or fashion.
1.1 (the ton) [treated as singular or plural] Fashionable society.
More example sentences
  • The ballroom was filled with all the fashionable people of the ton, and it left one to wonder if anyone had not been invited.
  • Raven black curls fell riotously around her face, holding no semblance at all to the painfully tidy styles of the London ton.

Origin

French, from Latin tonus (see tone).

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