Definition of tragic in English:

tragic

Syllabification: trag·ic
Pronunciation: /ˈtrajik
 
/

adjective

  • 2Of or relating to tragedy in a literary work.
    More example sentences
    • The Play of King Lear is a great tragic play that many tragedies try to compare to.
    • Then again, it's a theme of war films to make tragedies all the more tragic, isn't it?
    • He was the icon in an era of icons, but like Shakespeare's tragic heroes his fatal flaws cut short a certain glittering career.

Derivatives

tragical

adjective
More example sentences
  • In Chapter Six, Johnny meets Belladonna and loses her again, in tragical circumstances.
  • One of the things which I've learned from it all, from this - it's amazing how some - such a tragical experience can bring so much love and so much - can teach you so much.
  • In this sense, Shylock is a tragical figure instead of a comical one, because he has to make a difficult decision, either result of which will hurt himself.

tragically

Pronunciation: /-ik(ə)lē/
adverb
More example sentences
  • The truth of his statement was tragically demonstrated during the 1998 race.
  • As was tragically the case with one young boy recently who ate peanut butter, allergies can be fatal.
  • This Hampshire home will sparkle more than ever this year in honour of a woman whose life was cut tragically short.

Origin

mid 16th century: from French tragique, via Latin from Greek tragikos, from tragos 'goat', but associated with tragōidia (see tragedy).

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