Definition of transcendental in English:

transcendental

Syllabification: tran·scen·den·tal
Pronunciation: /ˌtransenˈdentl
 
/

adjective

  • 1Of or relating to a spiritual or nonphysical realm: the transcendental importance of each person’s soul
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    • The spiritual in man may soar in the highest transcendental realms, but man's body is essentially that of an animal.
    • Hindus readily accept as reality transcendental realms of Gods and devas and higher modes of consciousness than that in which we commonly live.
    • Isaac's prayer is symbolic of the transcendental spiritual beauty of Judaism.
  • 1.1(In Kantian philosophy) presupposed in and necessary to experience; a priori.
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    • Echoes of the subsequent post-Hegelian criticisms of Kantian transcendental philosophy are found in the early work of Horkheimer and Marcuse.
    • Husserl sees his own transcendental phenomenology as the true heir to Kant's transcendental philosophy.
    • Eze evidently thinks it very important to emphasize that Kant appealed to his transcendental philosophy and his theory of the a priori to formulate his racial theory.
  • 1.2Relating to or denoting Transcendentalism.
    More example sentences
    • Kant's assertion that transcendental idealism entails empirical realism is difficult to interpret.
    • On the other hand, transcendental empiricism has epistemological implications insofar as knowledge too must be formed in a process of individuation.
    • How should we assess Husserl's transcendental phenomenology?
  • 2 Mathematics (Of a number, e.g., e or π) real but not a root of an algebraic equation with rational roots.
    More example sentences
    • Liouville had introduced such numbers as examples of transcendental numbers - real numbers that are not roots of polynomial equations with integer coefficients.
    • Mathematicians had regarded algebraic numbers as, in some sense, simpler than transcendental numbers.
    • The very names negative numbers, irrational numbers, transcendental numbers, imaginary numbers, and ideal points at infinity indicate ambivalence.
  • 2.1(Of a function) not capable of being produced by the algebraical operations of addition, multiplication, and involution, or the inverse operations.
    More example sentences
    • If fifth-degree polynomials are so hard, what can one do with transcendental functions of a complex variable?
    • It was decided to concentrate on a three-volume work on the Higher transcendental functions, to be followed by two volumes of tables of integrals.
    • I have just finished an extensive treatise on a certain class of transcendental functions to present it to the Institute which will be done next Monday.

Derivatives

transcendentalize

verb
More example sentences
  • Why transcendentalize the arbitrary confections dreamt up by a particular animal's socio-biotic coding?
  • That immediately transcendentalizes them in two ways.
  • He is also opposed to any move to transcendentalize trauma, thereby neutralizing the moral differences between victims and perpetrators (since everyone is always already traumatized).

transcendentally

adverb
More example sentences
  • In short, what it was like to be transcendentally fatalist in a time when conventional, run-of-the-mill fatalism wasn't enough.
  • I remained almost transcendentally calm, Christ-like in my turning of the other cheek and Gandhi-like in my restraint from smacking him in the mouth.
  • How can your current beliefs be so transcendentally correct if you yourself recently believed something very different?

Origin

early 17th century: from medieval Latin transcendentalis (see transcendent).

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Pronunciation: ˌkɒlərəˈtjʊərə
noun
elaborate ornamentation of a vocal melody