Definition of treacle in English:

treacle

Syllabification: trea·cle
Pronunciation: /ˈtrēkəl
 
/

noun

  • 1 British term for molasses.
    More example sentences
    • An innovation confined mainly to Britain was treacle or molasses from sugar cane.
    • Mix together the egg, 125g muscovado sugar, treacle, buttermilk and remaining butter until smooth.
    • Well, a rum baba and a treacle tart were atypically heavy.
  • 2Cloying sentimentality or flattery: enough of this treacle—let’s get back to business
    More example sentences
    • All this loss - of innocence, of dearly loved creatures - and yet, there is not a word of sentimentality or taste of treacle.
    • In such a time, his greatest mistake is not sweetening his logic with sentimental treacle.
    • Without any sentimental treacle, I cried all the way through.

Derivatives

treacly

Pronunciation: /ˈtrēk(ə)lē/
adjective
More example sentences
  • Once these were distilled from molasses, which left a black treacly taste simmering underneath the juniper and other botanicals.
  • Unrefined brown sugars (light or dark muscovado) taste fudgy and treacly and are perfect for toffee-like sauces.
  • Everything for 20 yards was treacly with gritty black fat.

Origin

Middle English (originally denoting an antidote against venom): from Old French triacle, via Latin from Greek thēriakē 'antidote against venom', feminine of thēriakos (adjective), from thērion 'wild beast'. The sense 'molasses' dates from the late 17th century; 'sentimentality' arose in the late 18th century.

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a small amount; a little