There are 2 main definitions of trot in English:

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trot1

Syllabification: trot
Pronunciation: /trät
 
/

verb (trots, trotting, trotted)

1(With reference to a horse or other quadruped) proceed or cause to proceed at a pace faster than a walk, lifting each diagonal pair of legs alternately: [no obj]: the horses trotted slowly through the night [with object]: he trotted his horse forward
More example sentences
  • Sure enough, after ten minutes or so, hoof beats sounded, and a stately gelding mare trotted into his vision.
  • The black stallion trotted away from the house, beckoning her to follow him.
  • She watched as the brown stallion trotted into the yard with its two passengers.
Synonyms
run, jog;
scuttle, scurry, bustle, scamper
1.1 [no object] (Of a person) run at a moderate pace, typically with short steps.
Example sentences
  • The tall, thin volleyball player trotted quickly up the steps toward another endless hallway of oblivious dark.
  • Steven trotted up the steps to his home, clutching a bouquet of wild flowers in his hand.
  • Students trot on and off campus completely oblivious to the huge potential for campus life that lies just beneath their noses.
1.2 [no object] informal Go or walk briskly: he trotted over to the bonfire
More example sentences
  • Lady hesitated for a moment, watching the two in front of her with an inquisitive look before trotting off briskly to catch up.
  • She trotted briskly into the ring and saluted the judge and then she started.
  • Her face became even more troubled, and she trotted off briskly towards their monument.

noun

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1A trotting pace: our horses slowed to a trot
More example sentences
  • As Charcoal neared the edge of the woods, Mark leaned forward in the saddle, making her change her pace from a trot to a full-fledged gallop.
  • Kat walked Jazz for several minutes before increasing his pace to a trot.
  • Grant looked back behind their Jeep and saw Arian keeping pace at a mere trot.
2 (the trots) informal Diarrhea: a bad case of the trots
More example sentences
  • 'While living in Papua New Guinea as a child, my father and I got a bad case of the trots.’
  • Rehydration salts - Ah, the trots, I know a lot of people who never leave home without them, so a couple of these sachets tucked away won't come in wrong.
  • Where I come from, ‘trots’ has always been slang for diarrhea, i.e. ‘I had a terrible case of the trots this morning after all those pints last night.’
3US informal A literal translation of a foreign language text for use by students, especially in a surreptitious way: adult readers who can turn to translations without being penalized for depending on trots

Origin

Middle English: from Old French trot (noun), troter (verb), from medieval Latin trottare, of Germanic origin.

Phrases

on the trot

1
informal
1Continually busy: I’ve been on the trot all day
More example sentences
  • We again went on the trot all day trying to see everything.
  • He saw the tension on my face but he had no idea that I had been on the trot all morning.
2British In succession: they lost seven matches on the trot
More example sentences
  • We can't get too greedy, we've gone six games undefeated, seven on the trot with the cup matches.
  • The Villagers trailed 12-8 at half-time but turned it round superbly after the break in what was their fourth away match on the trot.
  • I think he also won four big Open matches on the trot once.

Phrasal verbs

trot something out

1
informal Produce the same information, story, or explanation that has been produced many times before: everyone trots out the old excuse
More example sentences
  • The old favourites are trotted out: better inter-agency working; more sharing of information; improved record-keeping; more sophisticated risk assessment.
  • And even now, just occasionally, someone from the Old School will still trot them out.
  • Twenty-one years on and the same old collection of ideas are trotted out from the business lobby.

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There are 2 main definitions of trot in English:

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Trot2

Line breaks: Trot

Entry from British & World English dictionary

noun

informal , chiefly derogatory
A Trotskyist or supporter of extreme left-wing views: a band of subversive Trots he declared that the Corporation was a ‘nest of long-haired Trots’

Origin

1960s: abbreviation.

Definition of trot in:

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