Definition of troth in English:

troth

Syllabification: troth
Pronunciation: /trôTH, trōTH
 
/

noun

1 archaic or formal Faith or loyalty when pledged in a solemn agreement or undertaking: a token of troth
More example sentences
  • By my troth, I love thee more than any other man can.
  • He also assesses critically the corrosive ideology of transient troth and individual gratification that has driven a good deal of this contemporary pathos.
  • The arch-bishop himself, Æthelnoth, came from Canterbury to witness our troth; I could scarce raise my eyes to him, knowing as he must every blemish of my soul.
2 archaic Truth.
More example sentences
  • If you haven't guessed by now the answer is located here, gentle readers, and I do beg thy pardon if I spake not in troth.
  • We have much to be thoroughly ashamed of if, in troth, we bear the burdens of one another.
  • And he might have, had Nathan not used a fiction to flush the troth out of hiding.

Origin

Middle English: variant of truth.

Phrases

pledge (or plight) one's troth

Make a solemn pledge of commitment or loyalty, especially in marriage.
More example sentences
  • Based on extremely unscientific assumptions, I'm sure that getting married aboard used to be about escaping from all the wedding hassles and family politics, and plighting your troth in romantic seclusion.
  • You've finally done it - tied the knot, taken the plunge, plighted your troth, joined in holy matrimony.
  • ‘I think the governor has to be given on opportunity to plight his troth to the electorate of California,’ she said.

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