Definition of tug in English:

tug

Syllabification: tug
Pronunciation: /təg
 
/

verb (tugs, tugging, tugged)

[with object]

noun

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  • 1A hard or sudden pull: another tug and it came loose figurative an overwhelming tug of attraction
    More example sentences
    • I took the edge of the blanket and gave it a hard tug pulling the whole thing off the bed.
    • He began drawing a detailed picture of an angel when a sudden tug on his shoulders nearly made him fall off the bench.
    • About 5 minutes later I felt a hard tug, and started reeling in the fish.
    Synonyms
  • 2 short for tugboat.
    More example sentences
    • The bridge swings open so massive cruise ships and small tugboats can enter the harbor.
    • Many parked their cars along River Road and either set up chairs or stood and watched as a tugboat nudged the ship into place.
    • ‘The nearest boat to the tugboat was 40 nautical miles away and we managed to be there in about two hours,’ he said.
  • 2.1An aircraft towing a glider.
    More example sentences
    • By 1960, only seven remained active as target tugs and radar calibration aircraft for the gunnery ranges ashore or the fleet guns.
    • There is an open question as to what the legal status of these operations would be after the exemption expires and our towing operations that use heavy tugs move to light-sport aircraft.
    • Portability as well as being able to be flown from hang gliding flight parks using hang glider tugs has been the criteria for design.
  • 3A loop from a horse’s saddle that supports a shaft or trace.
    More example sentences
    • Most folks hang their shafts too low and you need to restrain the tug so it doesn't fly forward and backward as the animal performs maneuvers.
    • The tug straps loop through the gullet of the saddle and then buckle back to the collar.

Derivatives

tugger

noun
More example sentences
  • But then in 1904 we were in the main forelock tuggers.
  • They'll carry your bag, serve you well and even have time for intelligent conversation, but if you seek forelock tuggers, seek elsewhere.
  • Usually the darling of the heartstring tugger or a hard-headed military man, it's easy to forget that he can do anything else.

Origin

Middle English: from the base of tow1. The noun is first recorded (late Middle English) in sense 3 of the noun.

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