Definition of unite in English:

unite

Syllabification: u·nite
Pronunciation: /yo͞oˈnīt
 
/

verb

1Come or bring together for a common purpose or action: [no object]: he called on the party to unite [with object]: they are united by their love of cars
More example sentences
  • News of her pregnancy unites them again after the marriage seemed to be over, but a later tragedy shatters his confidence, and his world begins to unravel.
  • The whole community unites in extending congratulations to this very popular couple.
  • Three hugely significant events were being commemorated and the whole community united in many ways to celebrate them.
1.1Come or bring together to form a unit or whole, especially in a political context: [no object]: the two Germanys officially united [with object]: he aimed to unite Italy and Sicily under his imperial crown his work unites theory and practice
More example sentences
  • The actress added how mutual cooperation made them unite into one whole being and stop thinking about who is a better partner.
  • What Newton did to simplify the planetary motions must now be done to unite in one whole the various isolated theories of mathematical physics.
  • His father, Vincenzio Galilei, was a musician whose originality and polemic talents fomented a revolution uniting practice and theory in music much as Galileo was to unite them in science.
1.2 [with object] archaic Join in marriage.
More example sentences
  • The marriage official returned the license to the clerk after certifying that he had performed a marriage ceremony uniting the couple named in the license.
  • Like many rulers, she used marriage as a means to create and cement alliances, uniting her daughter Henrietta Maria and Charles I of England, for example.

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin unit- 'joined together', from the verb unire, from unus 'one'.

Derivatives

unitive

Pronunciation: /ˈyo͞onətiv, yo͞oˈnī-/
adjective
More example sentences
  • There was no dichotomy between a social and a spiritual gospel to these men who held a unitive concept of truth.
  • In the 1930's, when devout convert philosopher Dietrich von Hildrebrand wrote a book extolling the unitive power of sex in marriage, it was widely regarded as dangerous and potentially heretical.
  • Ironically Pope Paul's affirmation of the unitive and procreative goals of marriage set the scene for Pope John Paul II's theology of the body which speaks so powerfully to young adults today.

Definition of unite in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day flippant
Pronunciation: ˈflɪp(ə)nt
adjective
not showing a serious or respectful attitude