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utopia

Syllabification: u·to·pi·a
Pronunciation: /yo͞oˈtōpēə
 
/

Definition of utopia in English:

noun

An imagined place or state of things in which everything is perfect. The word was first used in the book Utopia (1516) by Sir Thomas More. The opposite of dystopia.
Example sentences
  • "Brooklyn's a place that has taken on an identity as this sort of creative utopia," Butler said.
  • People seem to regard Fire Island as a utopia, and it's not hard to discern why.
  • The social utopia you crave is an anathema to a majority.
Synonyms
paradise, heaven (on earth), Eden, Garden of Eden, Shangri-La, Elysium;
idyll, nirvana, God's country
literary Arcadia

Origin

based on Greek ou 'not' + topos 'place'.

More
  • The English scholar and statesman Sir Thomas More wrote Utopia in Latin in 1516, depicting an imaginary island enjoying a perfect social, legal, and political system. The name implies that such an ideal place exists ‘nowhere’, as More created it from Greek ou ‘not’, and topos ‘place’ the source of terms such as topography (mid 17th century), the arrangement of the physical features of an area. In the 17th century other writers started using utopia for other imaginary places where everything is perfect. The opposite of a utopia is a dystopia where everything is as bad as possible, a word formed in the late 18th century from Greek dus- ‘bad’, as if More had formed the word from Greek eu- ‘good’. Cacotopia or kakotopia (early 19th century) are less popular alternatives to dystopia. Topia has recently come to be used as a combining form for new words such as ecotopia, an ideal ecological world; motopia, a slightly misleading term as it means an ideal world where the use of cars is limited; pornotopia, the ideal setting for pornography; queuetopia, a far from ideal world of long queues; and subtopia, the ideal suburban world.

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