There are 2 definitions of writ in English:

writ1

Syllabification: writ

noun

  • 1A form of written command in the name of a court or other legal authority to act, or abstain from acting, in some way.
    More example sentences
    • The applicant commenced proceedings in this Court for writs of mandamus, certiorari and injunctions.
    • In September 2004, the applicant filed an application in the High Court for the constitutional writs of certiorari and mandamus.
    • Where a court or a public officer wrongly refuses jurisdiction the exercise of the jurisdiction can be commanded by a writ of mandamus.
    Synonyms
  • 1.1 (one's writ) One’s power to enforce compliance or submission; one’s authority: you have business here which is out of my writ and competence
    More example sentences
    • Azor holds this land from Robert [d' Oilly], but the men of the Hundred testify that he ought to hold it from the King, as King William restored it to him at Windsor and gave him his writ for it.
    • The land itself is his gift; whoever owns any portion of it must show the writ and seal of the giver, or must at least bring such evidence as the law demands to prove that it has really been granted to him.
    • he uttered no protest against the writ in which William King of England - the new-fangled title was now coming in - announced to all his faithful subjects, French and English, that he had given the archbishopric of Canterbury and all that belonged to it to Archbishop Anselm.

Origin

Old English, as a general term denoting written matter, from the Germanic base of write.

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Word of the day tortie
Pronunciation: ˈtɔːtiː
noun
a tortoiseshell cat

There are 2 definitions of writ in English:

writ2

Syllabification: writ

verb

  • archaic past participle of write.
    More example sentences
    • And no doubt it is part of our middle western definition of community, writ in the dictionary of our hearts, not scrawled on some public wall.
    • There is no dogma - ‘… none of these are writ in stone’ - is one comment on his site.
    • Was it writ all over my face that I was a first time visitor to their city, with my nerves in top gear?

Phrases

writ large

Clear and obvious: the unspoken question writ large upon Rose’s face
More example sentences
  • Obviously, dejection was writ large on his face, as he could not get more ‘coverage’.
  • That observation is writ large if one looks at the history of the bill.
  • The anger of victims confronted with the complacency and hostility of local and federal authorities was writ large on their faces and made clear in their comments to reporters.
In a stark or exaggerated form: bribing people by way of tax allowances is the paternalistic state writ large
More example sentences
  • Foer's work locates itself somewhere in this shifting landscape, between memory and monumentality, image and immortality: it's the personal odyssey writ large.
  • But I think that the superhero-as-metaphor involves a superhero being some sort of intellectual, emotional, or other such concept writ large.
  • The supercharged psyche of young adulthood is writ large on the landscape: nothing is as it seems, and every tiny item - a rock, a song, a glance - means more than it can possibly say.

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