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Gallic

Line breaks: Gal¦lic
Pronunciation: /ˈɡalɪk
 
/

Definition of Gallic in English:

adjective

1Of or characteristic of France or the French: a Gallic shrug
More example sentences
  • Initially, the teenagers zipping along the tree-lined streets on mopeds put me in mind of small-town France, but the Gallic atmosphere evaporated when I realised that everyone was drinking tea.
  • Travellers to France will discover that the French are no less Gallic for the abolition of the franc.
  • But as Reuters reports, he is shrugging off the boycott, presumably with that Gallic shrug which Americans in particular seem to find so irritating.
2Relating to the Gauls: the Gallic retreat from Delphi
More example sentences
  • The Gallic confederacy formed under Vercingetorix; Gaul breaks into open rebellion.
  • The ‘hearts’ will point to a marvellous recovery; that the Greens left with honour, as their Gallic conquerors would say.
  • In Gaul, there was considerable continuity between pre-Roman and post-Roman populations, yet French contains only about 120 words with Gallic origins.

Origin

late 17th century: from Latin Gallicus, from Gallus 'a Gaul'.

Derivatives

Gallicize

1
(also Gallicise) verb
Example sentences
  • The Budapest-born Sebastian - he Gallicized his name - was an old hand in the theater.
  • Having attained ultimate power, Napoleon began to convert, or Gallicise the island of his birth.
  • We can either sprinkle our French with Creole or decide to Gallicize these expressions, these Creole words.

Definition of Gallic in:

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