Definition of Geordie in English:

Geordie

Line breaks: Geor|die
Pronunciation: /ˈdʒɔːdi
 
/
British informal

noun

  • 1A person from Tyneside.
    More example sentences
    • Speaking at the same press conference, he said: ‘Quite simply, Bobby's a Geordie and like all true Geordies he is no quitter.’
    • He said: ‘The team appreciates the efforts supporters make and we hope that our supporters will be out in force and out-sing the Geordies.’
    • ‘If you think like a winner, you will be a winner, and if you think like a loser, you will be a loser and Geordies are winners,’ he said.
  • 1.1 [mass noun] The English dialect or accent typical of people from Tyneside.
    More example sentences
    • Geordie is non-rhotic and the only urban accent of England in which initial h is not dropped.
    • While sending his four children to public school he has apparently given them all lessons in how to speak Geordie.
    • Ask any Geordie and he would have no doubt of the merit of this lead story.

adjective

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  • Relating to Tyneside, its people, or their accent or dialect: Geordie humour
    More example sentences
    • As the son of a Geordie miner without the means to pursue his art interest through the postgrad system, he decided instead to carry it on in music.
    • Born to shout, he is Sid without the classical education, the Geordie patois and the surreal wit, but with a moustache.
    • I love to hear a Geordie accent or a West Country Burr - even if sometimes it's difficult to make out what's being said.

Origin

mid 19th century: diminutive of the given name George.

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