Definition of aboard in English:

aboard

Line breaks: aboard
Pronunciation: /əˈbɔːd
 
/

adverb & preposition

  • 1On or into (a ship, aircraft, train, or other vehicle): [as adverb]: the plane crashed, killing all 158 people aboard figurative he came aboard as IBM’s new chairman [as preposition]: I climbed aboard the yacht
    More example sentences
    • Perhaps the customers have magically climbed aboard a ship.
    • Most rail passengers felt uneasy as they climbed aboard their first train after the Paddington disaster.
    • I climb aboard the train a minute or two before it pulls out of the station and find to my horror that my seat is taken.
  • 1.1On or on to (a horse): [as adverb]: with Richard Migliore aboard, he won the cup at a gallop
    More example sentences
    • His last win was aboard a horse called Volvo at Punchestown.
    • He has already won in Limerick on his other horse Ballytobin and aboard Kilcrea Shyan in Listowel two years ago.
    • Photo number two shows local postman Owen McDonald aboard his horse and cart driving up Ballymanus Terrace.
  • 1.2 Baseball On base: [as adverb]: putting their first batter aboard
    More example sentences
    • The jerk came up to bat looking grim and manly and got aboard with a bloop grounder down the third-base line.
    • In the bottom of the fifth, the Kikuyus added an insurance run when Harold got aboard on an error and Demetrius slapped a routine grounder that went under the shortstop's glove and past the left fielder.
    • The Reds nudged and shouldered at the lead, putting their first batter aboard in the third, fourth, and fifth innings but never quite bringing him around.

Phrases

all aboard!

A call warning passengers to get on a ship, train, or bus that is about to depart.
More example sentences
  • It's all aboard the Air Train to Denver International Airport - even though passengers won't be loading luggage for another 10 years.
  • Then it's all aboard to see the royal beds (yes, singles; separate rooms), the portable Rolls-Royce Phantom, and the surprisingly naff 1950s furniture.
  • It is all aboard for the 7.45 pm Gravesend Railway Enthusiasts Society meeting on July 30.

Origin

late Middle English: from a-2 (expressing motion) + board, reinforced by Old French à bord.

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