Definition of allure in English:

allure

Line breaks: al¦lure
Pronunciation: /əˈljʊə
 
, əˈljɔː/

noun

[mass noun]
The quality of being powerfully and mysteriously attractive or fascinating: people for whom gold holds no allure
More example sentences
  • Instead, the shadows crept over her, giving her a rather mysterious allure and then soon took off.
  • Despite its romantic allure, gold has historically been a pretty lousy investment.
  • Part of the continuing allure of police action films is the chance to get under the skin of a criminal, to glimpse into an alien world.
Synonyms

verb

[with object] Back to top  
Powerfully attract or charm; tempt: will sponsors really be allured by such opportunities?
More example sentences
  • The once pretty and alluring attraction of Little Marlow had been lost.
  • Becky, working as a governess, resorts to her good looks and alluring personality to move up in society.
  • This British duo continues to rock with alluring sensitivity and a plenitude of pop sensibility.
Synonyms

Origin

late Middle English (in the sense 'tempt, entice'): from Old French aleurier 'attract', from a- (from Latin ad 'to') + luere 'a lure' (originally a falconry term).

Derivatives

allurement

noun
More example sentences
  • It was held that the attractive-looking berries constituted an allurement to children for which the defendants were liable.
  • I was walking with some girlfriends one sunny day and the conversation drifted around to what one thing we would wish for to make us feel better about our physical allurements.
  • The law prohibits conversion from one religion to another by ‘the use of force or allurement or by fraudulent means’.

Definition of allure in:

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