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ambuscade

Line breaks: am¦bus|cade
Pronunciation: /ˌambəˈskeɪd
 
/

Definition of ambuscade in English:

noun

dated
An ambush: our sensibilities are being battered with reports of killings and ambuscades
More example sentences
  • In politics, as in war, we meet with certain ardent minds which never understand the utility of marches, counter marches, ambuscades, and affairs of outposts.
  • ‘I grew up with it, getting to know the various places of battles, skirmishes, sieges, ambuscades, ancient strongholds and war trails,’ wrote William.
  • The group were active in the late 1980s and used to conduct daring ambuscades on mostly abusive police and local officials.

verb

[with object] archaic Back to top  
Ambush (someone): French and his companions were ambuscaded by the Indians
More example sentences
  • It was evident that the enemy were ambuscaded in great force.
  • But Rosie broke the compact and ambuscaded the poor fellow.
  • During an expedition to the frontier for the object of punishing a marauding party, his company was ambuscaded and made a desperate resistance, but were overpowered and put to flight.

Origin

late 16th century: from French embuscade, from Italian imboscata, Spanish emboscada, or Portuguese embuscada, based on a late Latin word meaning 'to place in a wood'; related to bush1.

Definition of ambuscade in:

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