Definition of antipodes in English:

antipodes

Line breaks: an|tipo|des
Pronunciation: /anˈtɪpədiːz
 
/

noun

1 (the Antipodes) Australia and New Zealand (used by inhabitants of the northern hemisphere): there were plants from the Antipodes, including eucalyptuses and acacias
More example sentences
  • Well as a final question: the two games this weekend that are of particular interest to us down here in the Antipodes, England and Australia, and Ireland and New Zealand.
  • Some of the best directors in the world come from the Antipodes, with New Zealand making a huge parallel contribution with artists like Jane Campion and Peter Jackson.
  • Geographically the very notion of the Antipodes has long been obsolete, since of course the continents above the equator don't need a counter-weight below to keep the globe from toppling sideways into deep space.
2The direct opposite of something: voting and violence are antipodes
More example sentences
  • They use the antagonism between the antipodes; the contrast of white and brown; and the polarity of night and day as a means of exploring issues of cultural imperialism and its legacy.
  • ‘Some apparently interesting places in Sumner, such as Shag Rock, have their antipodes just offshore in Spain while a nice little plaza in Foz is situated opposite a private home in your place,’ he said.
  • Strictly speaking, the words ‘choice’, ‘chance’ and ‘destiny’ are antipodes of each other.

Origin

late Middle English: via French or late Latin from Greek antipodes 'having the feet opposite', from anti 'against, opposite' + pous, pod- 'foot'. The term originally denoted the inhabitants of opposite sides of the earth.

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