Share this entry

Share this page

apprentice

Line breaks: ap¦pren|tice
Pronunciation: /əˈprɛntɪs
 
/

Definition of apprentice in English:

noun

1A person who is learning a trade from a skilled employer, having agreed to work for a fixed period at low wages: [as modifier]: an apprentice electrician
More example sentences
  • It doesn't matter how much money we give employers to take on apprentices in tradition trades - in gas fitting, in tiling, in welding and carpentry.
  • It is often asserted that by keeping wages low for apprentices, employers will automatically take more on.
  • This language has an old-fashioned ring, and was designed for a minor becoming an apprentice in a skilled trade.
Synonyms
trainee, learner, probationer, tyro, novice, mentee, neophyte, raw recruit, fledgling, new boy/girl, novitiate;
North American informal rookie, greenhorn, tenderfoot
1.1 [usually as modifier] A beginner: an apprentice barman
More example sentences
  • Trainers use apprentice riders because they get a five-pound weight advantage.
  • Rose, 26, of State College, Pennsylvania, won the Eclipse Award outstanding apprentice jockey in 2001.
  • The station was loaded up with apprentice bingo callers and Algonquin grads who were grateful to have a job.

verb

[with object] (usually be apprenticed to) Back to top  
1Employ (someone) as an apprentice: Edward was apprenticed to a printer
More example sentences
  • In 1706 he was apprenticed to a printer (as his father could not afford to enter him for the Church), and in 1715 he was admitted a freeman of the Stationers' Company.
  • At about the age of sixteen he was apprenticed to a sign painter in whose shop his work included painting tinned cans.
  • Following the death of his brother Geoff, in 1947, he was apprenticed to his father, a renowned blacksmith's farrier.
1.1 [no object] North American Serve as an apprentice: she apprenticed with midwives in San Francisco
More example sentences
  • He founded his own business in the mid 1970s, and by 2004, at least fifteen master artists currently heading their own studios had apprenticed under him.
  • Either you apprentice with a Master or inherit the job.
  • What am I apprenticing for that would require… this?

Origin

Middle English: from Old French aprentis (from apprendre 'learn', from Latin apprehendere 'apprehend'), on the pattern of words ending in -tis, -tif, from Latin -tivus (see -ive).

Words that rhyme with apprentice

compos mentis, in loco parentis, prentice

Definition of apprentice in:

Share this entry

Share this page

 

What do you find interesting about this word or phrase?

Comments that don't adhere to our Community Guidelines may be moderated or removed.

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day terpsichorean
Pronunciation: ˌtəːpsɪkəˈriːən
adjective
relating to dancing