Definition of armature in English:

armature

Line breaks: arma|ture
Pronunciation: /ˈɑːmətʃə
 
, -tj(ʊ)ə/

noun

1The rotating coil or coils of a dynamo or electric motor.
More example sentences
  • Silicon steel stampings are used in the laminations of electric motor armatures, rotors, and generators.
  • I think the main objective of the salvors here would have been the copper from the electric motors, and the remains of what looks like the armature of an electric motor lies cleaned of its windings among the debris.
  • In a regular can motor, the armature spins inside the can when an electric current is applied.
1.1Any moving part of an electrical machine in which a voltage is induced by a magnetic field.
More example sentences
  • If you input electrical energy the armature turns and you have a motor; if you turn the armature physically electrical energy comes out and you have a generator.
  • The armature actuates a valve closing element which interacts with a fixed valve seat of a fuel valve and is movable away from the fixed valve seat when the magnetic coil is excited.
  • A barrier valve including an armature, longitudinally movable toward a pole core by excitation of an electrical winding.
1.2A piece of iron or other object acting as a keeper for a magnet.
More example sentences
  • A tappet that has the closing member is engaged by a magnet armature that acts on the seat valve in the closing direction and a restoring spring that acts in the opening direction.
  • Sixth, distinct increase of power by employment of the device of a so-called armature made of the same metal with which the physicists are accustomed to surround resinous and vitreous bodies.
  • The Denso unit is wound with square cross section copper wire, which puts 33-percent more copper in the armature, improving magnetic efficiency by the same percentage.
2An open framework on which a sculpture is moulded with clay or similar material.
More example sentences
  • Constructed from canvas and other materials stretched onto welded steel armatures, the sculptures are bulbous and faceted, like an insect's eye or a landscape seen from a plane.
  • In plaster, as in clay modelling, an armature or skeleton framework is necessary for a free-standing figure.
  • Scattered in front of this painting like an unruly audience were chair sculptures composed of armatures wrapped with everything from plaster bandages to chenille bedspreads bound with rope to endless rounds of thin copper wire.
2.1A framework or formal structure, especially of a literary work: Shakespeare’s plots have served as the armature for many novels
More example sentences
  • Weinberg made four orchestral suites out of numbers from the ballet music, without the idea of keeping the armature of the plot.
  • The Modernist obsession with control is superseded by a more responsive, flexible armature for different sorts of activities.
  • An example is Odysseus's journey that forms the narrative armature of the Odyssey.
3 Biology The protective covering of an animal or plant.
More example sentences
  • There is no evidence for armature on the walking legs, however only a few legs are near complete and the lack of spines may be taphonomic.
  • Mantel's test did not reveal any correlation between armature, genetic distance and the overall quantitative morphological similarity.
3.1 [mass noun] archaic Armour.

Origin

late Middle English: from French, from Latin armatura 'armour', from armare 'to arm' (see arm2). The original sense was 'armour', hence 'protective covering' (sense 3, early 18th century), later 'keeper of a magnet', source of sense 1 (mid 19th century).

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