Definition of arrogate in English:

arrogate

Line breaks: ar¦ro|gate
Pronunciation: /ˈarəgeɪt
 
/

verb

[with object]
Take or claim (something) without justification: they arrogate to themselves the ability to divine the nation’s true interests
More example sentences
  • If Israel continues to seize and arrogate our land and ignore the rule of international law and legitimacy, then, yes, the ultimate outcome would be the resumption of violence and bloodshed.
  • In this, the government with a good majority is actually arrogating the powers of Parliament.
  • The Executive Branch arrogates the authority to become the investigator, the prosecutor, the judge, the jury, and then the executioner.
Synonyms

Origin

mid 16th century: from Latin arrogat- 'claimed for oneself', from the verb arrogare, from ad- 'to' + rogare 'ask'.

Derivatives

arrogation

Pronunciation: /-ˈgeɪʃ(ə)n/
noun
More example sentences
  • To presume to have all the answers is nothing but dangerous delusion for it is based on the arrogation of divine potency.
  • The judiciary's authority and independence was significantly impaired during the Abacha era by the military regime's arrogation of judicial power and prohibition of court review of its action.
  • There is, in fact, a firm bloc of three reactionaries - Scalia, Rehnquist and Thomas - that supports the executive branch's arrogation of unprecedented police powers.

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